Hercules

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Her·cu·les

 (hûr′kyə-lēz′)
n.
1. also Her·a·cles or Her·a·kles (hĕr′ə-klēz′) Greek & Roman Mythology The son of Zeus and Alcmene, a hero of extraordinary strength who won immortality by performing 12 labors demanded by the Argive king Eurystheus.
2. A constellation in the Northern Hemisphere near Lyra and Corona Borealis.

[Latin, from Greek Hēraklēs : Hērā, Hera + kleos, fame; see kleu- in Indo-European roots.]

Hercules

(ˈhɜːkjʊˌliːz) ,

Heracles

or

Herakles

n
1. (Classical Myth & Legend) classical myth Also called: Alcides a hero noted for his great strength, courage, and for the performance of twelve immense labours
2. a man of outstanding strength or size
ˌHercuˈlean, ˌHeraˈclean, ˌHeraˈklean adj

Hercules

(ˈhɜːkjʊˌliːz)
n, Latin genitive Herculeis (ˌhɜːkjʊˈliːɪs)
1. (Astronomy) a large constellation in the N hemisphere lying between Lyra and Corona Borealis
2. (Astronomy) a conspicuous crater in the NW quadrant of the moon, about 70 kilometres in diameter

Her•cu•les

(ˈhɜr kyəˌliz)

n. gen. -cu•lis (-kyə lɪs)
for 2.
1. a hero of classical myth, the son of Zeus and Alcmene, who possessed exceptional strength and was renowned esp. for the 12 labors he performed to gain immortality.
2. a northern constellation, between Lyra and Corona Borealis.

Her·cu·les

(hûr′kyə-lēz′)
A constellation in the Northern Hemisphere near Lyra and Corona Borealis.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Hercules - (classical mythology) a hero noted for his strengthHercules - (classical mythology) a hero noted for his strength; performed 12 immense labors to gain immortality
classical mythology - the system of mythology of the Greeks and Romans together; much of Roman mythology (especially the gods) was borrowed from the Greeks
2.Hercules - a large constellation in the northern hemisphere between Lyra and Corona Borealis

Hercules

Labours of Hercules

the slaying of the Nemean lion, the slaying of the Lernaean hydra, the capture of the hind of Ceryneia, the capture of the wild boar of Erymanthus, the cleansing of the Augean stables, the shooting of the Stymphalian birds, the capture of the Cretan bull, the capture of the horses of Diomedes, the taking of the girdle of Hippolyte, the capture of the cattle of Geryon, the recovery of the golden apples of Hesperides, the taking of Cerberus
Translations

Hercules

[ˈhɜːkjuliːz] NHércules

Hercules

n (lit, fig)Herkules m

Hercules

[ˈhɜːkjʊliːz] nErcole m
References in classic literature ?
There was no help near if we called, and the Herculeses who dragged us had a way of asking sweetly and flatteringly for bucksheesh, which was seductive, and of looking fierce and threatening to throw us down the precipice, which was persuasive and convincing.