Hermes Trismegistus


Also found in: Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Hermes Tris·me·gis·tus

 (trĭs′mə-jĭs′təs, trĭz′-)
n. Mythology
Hermes as identified with the Egyptian god Thoth, the legendary author of works on alchemy, astrology, and magic.

[Medieval Latin Hermēs Trismegistus, from Greek Hermēs trismegistos : Hermēs, Hermes + trismegistos, thrice greatest (tris, thrice; see trei- in Indo-European roots + megistos, greatest; see meg- in Indo-European roots).]

Hermes Trismegistus

(ˌtrɪsməˈdʒɪstəs)
n
(Classical Myth & Legend) a Greek name for the Egyptian god Thoth, credited with various works on mysticism and magic
[Greek: Hermes thrice-greatest]

Her′mes Tris•me•gis′tus

(ˌtrɪz məˈdʒɪs təs, ˌtrɪs-)
n.
a name attributed by Neoplatonists and others to an Egyptian priest or to the Egyptian god Thoth, to some extent identified with the Greek god Hermes: various mystical, astrological, and alchemical writings were ascribed to him.
[< Medieval Latin < Greek Hermês Trismégistos Hermes thrice greatest]
References in periodicals archive ?
The principle dating back to antiquity, first laid out in the tablet of Hermes Trismegistus, seems quite apt in our current circumstances.
Hermetic entered English in the early 17th century in reference to Hermes Trismegistus, as his name was Latinized, and it was soon used to describe things that were beyond ordinary comprehension.
Another approach to the Demiurge is found in Poimandres, the Shepherd of Men, the opening book of the Corpus Hermeticum, the most prominent of several collections of ancient mystical dialogues in which Hermes Trismegistus (the Egyptian Thoth) is the principal speaker.
again in Religio Mediei, mediocrity (in the sense of moderation), oraison (prayer), Hermes Trismegistus and the Corpus Hermeticorum, roundels (steps), cantons (nooks), composition (agreement).
His equivalent Ancient Egyptian God Thoth, the god of writing, the scribe; Hermes Trismegistus and his lore the corpus hermeticum, Hermes the guide of souls to the netherworld psychopompos and the conductor of dreams.
Hughes tells us the nave was dedicated to Hermes Trismegistus (selfevident nonsense) and that the central figure is Moses placed above an inscription saying, "Take up the laws of Egypt" (21).
For Lactantius, the teachings attributed to Hermes Trismegistus represented a prefiguring of many aspects of Christianity, and as such they could be used in the effort to convert educated pagans.
Supposedly Hermes Trismegistus was the scribe of the gods who authored the sacred hermetic works that described the material world as well as the quest for spiritual perfection.
For Casaubon, much of his interest in Hebrew writing and Jewish thought was related to his own, internal Christian polemics--especially his criticism of Hermes Trismegistus and his attack on Pietro Galatino.
Van den Kerchove, a specialist in Coptic and Late Antique religions, has written a trenchant account of the rituals and healing practices associated with the god Hermes Trismegistus in Late Antique Egypt.
The book contained diagrams and tracts about 'resurrection stones', strange configurations of the Tarot, Hiramic magic, Thoth Hermes Trismegistus, and other obscure occult matters.