hermeticism


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to hermeticism: Hermes Trismegistus

hermeticism

(hɜːˈmɛtɪˌsɪzəm)
n
(Alternative Belief Systems) a cult based on religious and philosophical beliefs attributed to Hermes and popular around the time of the Renaissance

her•met•i•cism

(hɜrˈmɛt əˌsɪz əm)

also her•me•tism

(ˈhɜr mɪˌtɪz-)

n. (sometimes cap.)
1. the body of ideas set forth in hermetic writings.
2. adherence to the ideas expressed in hermetic writings.
3. the occult sciences, esp. alchemy.
[1890–95]
her•met′i•cist, adj., n.

Hermeticism2, hermeticism

1. the ideas or beliefs set forth in the writings of Hermes Trismegistus.
2. adherence to these ideas and beliefs.
See also: Alchemy, Philosophy
1. the occult concepts, ideas, or philosophy set forth in the writings of the hermeticists of the late Middle Ages and the early Renaissance.
2. adherence to, belief in, or propagation of these concepts and ideas.
3. Literature. a symbolic and arcane style similar to that of the hermeticists, especially in the poetry of certain French symbolist poets. — hermeticist, hermetist, n. — hermetic, hermetical, adj.
See also: Mysticism
1. the occult concepts, ideas, or philosophy set forth in the writings of the hermeticists of the late Middle Ages and the early Renaissance.
2. adherence to, belief in, or propagation of these concepts and ideas.
3. a symbolic and arcane style similar to that of the hermeticists, especially in the poetry of certain French symbolist poets. — hermeticist, hermetist, n. — hermetic, hermetical, adj.
See also: Literary Style
Translations

hermeticism

[hɜːˈmetɪsɪzəm] Nhermetismo m
References in classic literature ?
which had given him a violent passion for architecture, an inclination which had replaced in his heart his passion for hermeticism, of which it was, moreover, only a natural corollary, since there is an intimate relation between hermeticism and masonry.
Synopsis: In "Gnostic Mysteries of Sex: Sophia the Wild One and Erotic Christianity", author Tobias Churton (Britain's leading scholar of Western Esotericism, a world authority on Gnosticism, Hermeticism, and Rosicrucianism) takes the reader on an exploration of the sexual practices and doctrinal secrets of Gnosticism.
Without other historical benchmarks, moreover, the films double as their own insular history, leading to a false impression of hermeticism.
This has led to accusations of hermeticism and political quietism that continue to dog non-representational artworks.
Their ancestry is elsewhere, with heretical strains of Enthusiasm, Hermeticism, and Neo-Platonism.
Pessoa's writings were strongly influenced by clairvoyance, but his interest in esoteric practices was not limited to occultism, and included theosophy, astrology, hermeticism, alchemy and the Kabbalah.
A formidable hermeticism has long held sway over Anglophone poetry criticism.
Wunder's Keats, Hermeticism, and the Secret Societies (Hampshire: Ashgate, 2008).
My cofounder and husband, Paul Bartscher, comes from a background of hermeticism, kabbalah, and the Western mystery tradition.
What scholars have discovered recently is that it was the mix of Kabbalah, Hermeticism, neo-Platonism and even magical texts boiling over in the 17th century that gave way to the genesis of modern science.
It is not only a shift into more concrete lived reality perhaps--though I am loathe to admit that it is due to the "coming out" in Bright Felon--I say "loathe" to admit because does that admission imply a falsity of intent in the hermeticism of what came before?
Her work draws from a range of poetic lineages and their styles: Objectivist attentiveness, Olson and Creeley's projective poetics of breath, Celan's spare hermeticism, Char's transfigured Provencal landscapes, Mallarme and du Bouchet's poetics of the page.