Herrenvolk


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Her·ren·volk

 (hĕr′ən-fōk′, -fôlk′)
n.
A master race.

[German : Herren, genitive pl. of Herr, master; see Herr + Volk, people, nation; see volkslied.]

Herrenvolk

(ˈhɛrənfɔlk)
n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) See master race

mas′ter race`


n.
a race, people, or nation whose members consider themselves superior to members of other groups.
[1925–30]

herrenvolk

A German word meaning master race.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.herrenvolk - a race that considers itself superior to all others and fitted to rule the othersHerrenvolk - a race that considers itself superior to all others and fitted to rule the others
race - people who are believed to belong to the same genetic stock; "some biologists doubt that there are important genetic differences between races of human beings"
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References in periodicals archive ?
Moreover, the Chinese are more than nationalistic; they are a people for whom the concept of Herrenvolk [master race] is not some passing and malign idiosyncrasy, but a defining condition of identity.
So one of Behan's arresting officers is described as having 'a blonde, Herrenvolk head' (p.
his policies of Lebensraum, Herrenvolk and ruthless determination quite clear, yet incredibly, few heeded these threats until it was too late.
Pierre van den Berghe characterized this system as a herrenvolk democracy, (p.
Whereas labour defence activists often appealed to the dictates of natural law, rooted in a white herrenvolk republicanism, in order to delegitimize state-sanctioned violence against the working class, this same form of racial vigilantism was used to justify lynching in the south.
In addition to reasons of white geographic mobility and herrenvolk democracy outlined by Charles Bolton, the "competing and contradictory" nature of the relationship between whites and poor whites militated against any sort of underclass solidarity.
I was too much for the benighted herrenvolk of Brandfort, the children of Hendrik Verwoerd.
Melissa Steyn, following George Frederickson, points out that South Africa and the United States, "more than other multiracial societies resulting from the expansion of Europe between the sixteenth century and the twentieth" (2001: 23), have taken the idea of racial differentiation to its utmost extreme, creating "a kind of Herrenvolk society in which people of color, however numerous or acculturated they may be, are treated as permanent aliens or outsiders" (Frederickson 1981: xi-xii).
But there is nothing inherently superior about the herrenvolk idea of the supremacy of the whites.
Israel's rule in the occupied territories has transformed it from an imperfect liberal democracy into a Herrenvolk democracy, a term coined for apartheid South Africa, where one group of citizens enjoys full rights, and another group none.
But how did he get under the skin of one of the Herrenvolk so successfully?
As US institutional political support for apartheid crumbled, South Africa's herrenvolk settler regime sank into the dustbin of history.