Hertzsprung


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Hertzsprung

(Danish hɛrdsbrɔŋ)
n
(Biography) Ejnar (ˈəɪnar). 1873–1967, Danish astronomer: he discovered the existence of giant and dwarf stars, originating one form of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram
References in periodicals archive ?
En 1911 Ejnar Hertzsprung y Henry Norris Russell establecen la relacion entre la luminosidad y el color de las estrellas, y la expresan como una sucesion, conocida como Diagrama de Hertzsprung-Russell.
In 1927 the Danish astronomer Ejnar Hertzsprung (1873-1967; Figure 13), of Hertzsprung-Russell diagram fame, was examining plates in the archives at Harvard College Observatory.
During the early 20th century astronomers Hertzsprung and Russel independently discovered a correlation between the stellar luminosity (brightness corrected for distance) and spectral class.
Once the Cepheid yardstick (see 1912) had been worked out by Leavitt and Hertzsprung (see 1905), it became possible to find Cepheids in the globular clusters and determine their distances and the distances of the clusters themselves.
The terms were conied by Danish astronomer Ejnar Hertzsprung.
The Danish astronomer Ejnar Hertzsprung (1873-1967) suggested that if a star's distance were known, one could calculate what magnitude it would have if it were some standard distance away.
Halm was soon followed in this concept by Ejnar Hertzsprung who, in 1919, also established a relationship between these two variables [94].
Ejnar Hertzsprung noticed that the colour of Jupiter's satellite Io was orange.
In the decade before Russell's work, Ejnar Hertzsprung (1893-1967) had studied stars and independently came to some ideas that were precursors to Russell's diagram.
Danish astronomer Ejnar Hertzsprung discovered years later that Maury's c-subdivision separated normal red stars from luminous red giants, a discovery he attributed to Maury's sharp eye in distinguishing stellar spectra.
Ejnar Hertzsprung and Henry Norris Russell independently constructed the first such plots nearly a century ago, and they are therefore today called Hertzsprung-Russell diagrams, or H-R diagrams.
It seems to me, that with this discovery the great question, if the spirals belong to the system of the milky way or not, is answered with great certainty to the end, that they do not," Danish astronomer Ejnar Hertzsprung wrote Slipher.