Hesione


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Related to Hesione: Laomedon

Hesione

(hɪˈsaɪənɪ)
n
(Classical Myth & Legend) Greek myth daughter of King Laomedon, rescued by Hercules from a sea monster
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Laomedon was a notorious double-dealer who first triggered retribution by not remunerating Apollo and Poseidon for building Troy's walls, and later invited destruction by failing to pay Heracles for saving his daughter Hesione (Apollodorus 1921, vol.
Her many memorable performances included Eleanor of Aquitaine in The Lion in Winter (1966), hassled actress Julie Cavendish in The Royal Family (1975), flamboyant Hesione Hushabye in Heartbreak House (1983), the worried wife Barbara Jackson in Pack of Lies (1985), dizzy West End star Judith Bliss in Hay Fever (1985), the guilty Mrs.
Quite ironically, both playwrights work twists on this time-honored plot device: Shaw's "outsider" Ellie becomes through "heartbreak" an "insider," in effect the third of Shotover's daughters, defeating her rival, Hesione Hushabye, and discarding her putative lover, Mangan.
An incompatibility is noted for Amphitrite johnsoni larvae and Hesione pantherina with all the species.
Swoosie Kurtz is an odd choice to play the erotically fascinating Hesione Hushabye.
Priam, though, maintained the seizure of Helen was merely retribution for the capture of his sister, Hesione, taken to Greece by Hercules.
At this point in the poem Priam is enjoying a period of peace, but the fury Allecto (performing the same role she has in Aeneid VII), offended by Troy's tranquillity, reminds him that his sister Hesione has been abducted.
Mayor's prize piece of evidence adorns the dust-cover of the book: a vase-painting of about 550 BC with a scene of Herakles and Hesione fighting the Monster of Troy, depicted in the form of a huge animal skull bearing a remarkable resemblance to those of giant Miocene skulls since discovered not too far from Troy.
Known as the Hesione vase, this object was created about 550 B.
Not that you'd know it, at first, from the seemingly blithe self-absorption of Hesione Hushabye and her willfully eccentric relatives.
Like Heracles, who fights a sea monster to save Hesione, for instance; see E.