Hessian


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Hes·sian

 (hĕsh′ən)
adj.
Of or relating to Hesse or its inhabitants.
n.
1. A native or inhabitant of Hesse.
2. A German mercenary in the British army in America during the Revolutionary War.
3. A mercenary soldier.

hessian

(ˈhɛsɪən)
n
(Textiles) a coarse jute fabric similar to sacking, used for bags, upholstery, etc
[C18: from Hesse + -ian]

Hessian

(ˈhɛsɪən)
n
1. (Placename) a native or inhabitant of Hesse
2. (Historical Terms)
a. a Hessian soldier in any of the mercenary units of the British Army in the War of American Independence or the Napoleonic Wars
b. US any German mercenary in the British Army during the War of American Independence
3. (Military) chiefly US a mercenary or ruffian
adj
4. (Peoples) of or relating to Hesse or its inhabitants
5. (Placename) of or relating to Hesse or its inhabitants

Hes•sian

(ˈhɛʃ ən)

adj.
1. of or pertaining to Hesse or its inhabitants.
n.
2. a native or inhabitant of Hesse.
3. a Hessian mercenary used by England during the American Revolution.
4. a hireling or ruffian.
5. (l.c.) Chiefly Brit. burlap.
[1670–80; Hesse, Germany + -ian]

hessian

burlap
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Hessian - (19th century) a man's high tasseled boothessian - (19th century) a man's high tasseled boot
boot - footwear that covers the whole foot and lower leg

Hessian

noun
A freelance fighter:
Translations
Hessin

hessian

[ˈhesɪən] (esp Brit)
A. Narpillera f
B. ADJde arpillera

hessian

[ˈhɛsiən] ntoile f de jute, jute m

hessian

nSackleinen nt, → Rupfen m
attrsackleinen, aus Sackleinen or Rupfen

hessian

[ˈhɛsɪən] ntela di canapa
References in classic literature ?
It is said by some to be the ghost of a Hessian trooper, whose head had been carried away by a cannon-ball, in some nameless battle during the Revolutionary War, and who is ever and anon seen by the country folk hurrying along in the gloom of night, as if on the wings of the wind.
Another of his sources of fearful pleasure was to pass long winter evenings with the old Dutch wives, as they sat spinning by the fire, with a row of apples roasting and spluttering along the hearth, and listen to their marvellous tales of ghosts and goblins, and haunted fields, and haunted brooks, and haunted bridges, and haunted houses, and particularly of the headless horseman, or Galloping Hessian of the Hollow, as they sometimes called him.
and how often was he thrown into complete dismay by some rushing blast, howling among the trees, in the idea that it was the Galloping Hessian on one of his nightly scourings!
This story was immediately matched by a thrice marvellous adventure of Brom Bones, who made light of the Galloping Hessian as an arrant jockey.
Ichabod, who had no relish for this strange midnight companion, and bethought himself of the adventure of Brom Bones with the Galloping Hessian, now quickened his steed in hopes of leaving him behind.
He had just finished dressing for his ride, and wore a blue uniform, opening in front over a white waistcoat so long that it covered his rotund stomach, white leather breeches tightly fitting the fat thighs of his short legs, and Hessian boots.
All the head that I saw the monster possessed of was one of those Hessian canteens which resemble a large snuff-box with a hole in the middle of the lid.
on the Christmas cards), with their curly hair and natty hats, their well-shaped legs incased in smalls, their dainty Hessian boots, their ruffling frills, their canes and dangling seals.
A VERY stout, puffy man, in buckskins and Hessian boots, with several immense neckcloths that rose almost to his nose, with a red striped waistcoat and an apple green coat with steel buttons almost as large as crown pieces (it was the morning costume of a dandy or blood of those days) was reading the paper by the fire when the two girls entered, and bounced off his arm-chair, and blushed excessively, and hid his entire face almost in his neckcloths at this apparition.
At the very close of the campaign they bethought themselves of the fact that the strike had been broken by Negroes, and so they sent for a South Carolina fire-eater, the "pitchfork senator," as he was called, a man who took off his coat when he talked to workingmen, and damned and swore like a Hessian.
Nobody came near them, and their movements showed a mechanical regularity; their forms standing enshrouded in Hessian "wroppers"--sleeved brown pinafores, tied behind to the bottom, to keep their gowns from blowing about--scant skirts revealing boots that reached high up the ankles, and yellow sheepskin gloves with gauntlets.
There's a vooden leg in number six; there's a pair of Hessians in thirteen; there's two pair of halves in the commercial; there's these here painted tops in the snuggery inside the bar; and five more tops in the coffee-room.