hetmanate


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hetmanate

(ˈhɛtməˌneɪt)
n
all of the hetmans
References in periodicals archive ?
It has been burning with iron, drowning in blood and killing with starvation the memory of the UPR, the Central Rada, the Hetmanate and the Directorate for decades.
In 1764, the Cossack Hetmanate was finally abolished.
The Hetmanate negotiated directly and intensively, not only with the Muscovite capital but also with its military representative in the south, Grigorii Romodanovskii; Vyhovsky's interpretation of these events was that Romodanovskii was not well disposed towards him.
This essay, then, supports the case for considering this transfer of power in the Hetmanate and subsequent disputes as the "opening accord," or "opening salvo," of "The Ruin.
Plokhy concludes that the History was produced by a circle of patriots around the figure of Stepan Shyrai in the Starodub region of what was once part of the Hetmanate and is now part of southern Russia (p.
The cossack hetmanate recorded a military and political alliance with russia in the 1654 treaty of pereyaslav.
With the collapse of the Austro-Hungarian and the Russian Empires in 1917 and the surrender of Germany a year later, the short-lived Ukrainian National Republic and Hetmanate state (1917-1923) was overrun by hordes of the newly formed Russian Bolshevik forces.
6) Likewise, the Cossack starshina, transforming itself into a landed nobility, had a vested interest in integrating into the multiethnic--called "multicultural" by Rieber--ruling class of the Russian Empire, after drawing the Russian government into the politics of the Hetmanate for most of the 18th century.
Opinion in the Hetmanate, where the well-educated and cosmopolitan Cossack ruler's benefactions and patronage of the arts were very well-known, remained somewhat different.
Very little of this increase was the result of annexation, as the areas Russia annexed after the Smuta, the Ukrainian hetmanate, and the Baltic provinces were all low in population.
The Zaporozhians of southern Ukraine, however, always retained a certain autonomy and after the death of Khmelnytsky in 1657, more and more looked to their own local leader or Otaman (from the Turkish am, "father") first, and the ruler of the entire Cossack state, dubbed by historians "'the Hetmanate," second.
After 1660 Cossack Ukraine was divided into the largely pro-Muscovite Left-Bank (eastern) Hetmanate and the Right-Bank (western) Hetmanate, which initially rejected Muscovite control and maneuvered between Poland and the Ottoman Porte.