hibakusha


Also found in: Medical, Wikipedia.

hibakusha

(hɪˈbɑːkʊʃə)
n, pl -sha or -shas
(Historical Terms) a survivor of either of the atomic-bomb attacks on Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945
[C20: from Japanese, from hibaku exposed + -sha -person]
References in periodicals archive ?
SOME years ago I was privileged to speak with a Hibakusha - a survivor of the atomic bomb on Hiroshima.
SIR - Some years ago I was privileged to speak with a Hibakusha - a survivor of the atomic bomb on Hiroshima.
You're a hibakusha,' she said, 'We don't need a bombed bride.
At the same time, we applaud those who survived to become hibakusha.
3) Medical researchers at the US facility established on the hill above Hiroshima while Japan was under US military control examined vital signs of hibakusha and compared them with a group of Japanese from the area outside Hiroshima.
Nagasaki Mayor Tomihisa Taue issued a statement saying Japan's failure to support the statement "trampled on the efforts made so far by hibakusha and disappointed many other countries seeking nuclear abolition".
Known as Hibakusha, the survivors are globally lauded as shining examples of turning their personal tragedy into a struggle to promote peace and 'to create a world free of nuclear weapons'.
Survivors of another war-time atrocity, the atomic bomb dropped on Hiroshima, feature on pages 16-17 in poignant drawings by Carl Randall, a Newcastle artist now working in Japan, where he met the so-called Hibakusha and drew them in their homes.
According to a press release issued by the UN Information Center (UNIC) here on Tuesday, Ban highlighted the importance of making the stories of the hibakusha - as the victims of the bombings are known - heard throughout the world, to raise awareness of the effects of nuclear weapons and the need to eliminate them.
When the last hibakusha die, it will be our turn to keep on telling their stories to our children in the hope that we can live in a world free of nuclear arms.
In a Peace Declaration read at the memorial service, Hiroshima Mayor Kazumi Matsui urged US President Barack Obama and other world leaders to visit the A-bombed cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, hear the hibakusha (atomic-bomb sufferers), and encounter the reality of the atomic bombings.
Countless others, the hibakusha (or "explosion-affected people"), were exposed to the blast and remained unsure of their futures.