Higgs field


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Related to Higgs field: Higgs boson, Dark energy

Higgs field

n.
A hypothetical quantum field postulated to explain the property of mass in elementary particles. Higgs bosons arise as excitations of the Higgs field by other particles.

[After Peter Ware Higgs (born 1929), British physicist.]
References in periodicals archive ?
It is thought that after the Big Bang many particles had no mass, but became heavy later on thanks to the Higgs field.
In addition, the Higgs field gives mass only to electrons, muons and some other heavy particles [6, 9].
The more substantial the particle, the more mass the Higgs Field imparts upon it.
In this speculative work dealing with mind and quantum field theory, I subscribe to the notion that elementary fermions (spin-1/2 particles) are massless fields that generate luxons (particles that travel at lightspeed and hence do not experience spacetime) until they interact with the Higgs field whereby through the Feynman Penrose zig-zag picture they acquire both real and imaginary mass.
Along the same lines we also explore the possibility that cosmological inflation does not require a new field, but is driven by the Higgs field of the Standard Model.
Scientists believe just after the Big Bang the Higgs field drew together particles which were floating at the speed of light to gain mass and form the universe.
For decades, physicists have theorized that mass might not be an inherent property of matter particles, but rather the effect of their interaction with an almost undetectable quantum field permeating the universe: the Higgs field.
Specifically, the UCLA researchers write, the asymmetry may have been produced as a result of the motion of the Higgs field, which is associated with the Higgs boson, and which could have made the masses of particles and antiparticles in the universe temporarily unequal, allowing for a small excess of matter particles over antiparticles.
It strongly supports the Standard Model of particle physics and indicates towards the existence of the Higgs field, an invisible energy field present throughout the universe that fills other particles with mass.
According to the standard model of particle physics, the interaction strength between the fermions and the Higgs field must be proportional to their mass.
We now know that an invisible energy field, the Higgs field, stretches across the universe, one that clings to fundamental particles like the proton to give them mass.