High Church

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Related to High Church Party: High Churchmen

High Church

n
(Anglicanism) the party or movement within the Church of England stressing continuity with Catholic Christendom, the authority of bishops, and the importance of sacraments, rituals, and ceremonies. Compare Broad Church, Low Church
adj
(Anglicanism) of or relating to this party or movement
ˈHigh-ˈChurchman n

High′ Church′


adj.
(in the Anglican church) emphasizing the Catholic tradition, esp. in adherence to sacraments, rituals, and obedience to church authority.
[1695–1705]
High′ Church′man, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.High Church - a group in the Anglican Church that emphasizes the Catholic tradition (especially in sacraments and rituals and obedience to church authority)High Church - a group in the Anglican Church that emphasizes the Catholic tradition (especially in sacraments and rituals and obedience to church authority)
church service, church - a service conducted in a house of worship; "don't be late for church"
religious order, religious sect, sect - a subdivision of a larger religious group
References in classic literature ?
But when at last Defoe's meaning became plain the High Church party was very angry, and resolved to punish him.
On the other hand, the High Church party, who made up the bulk of the lower clergy, were more rigid, or in their view "orthodox," in doctrine and worship, and were fiercely opposed to the Dissenters.
The chair, Charles Blomfield, Bishop of London, leaned toward the high church party, whereas J.
The second, which the author might have inferred from his application to Peter Nockles, is that while no ginger group could be expected to take its gospel from the religion of the average Englishman, the Tractarians like the old High Church party before them were an important part of the process in which the Church of England turned its back on ordinary English religion, and this, whether the C of E is regarded as a church or as an establishment, was a serious business.
He might excoriate the High Church party for having, throughout English history, opposed improving measures of any kind; but he shared with his AngloCatholic adversaries the conviction that Christianity must be the law of the land.