hijacking

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hi·jack

also high·jack (hī′jăk′)
tr.v. hi·jacked, hi·jack·ing, hi·jacks also high·jacked or high·jack·ing or high·jacks
1.
a. To seize control of (a vehicle such as an airplane or bus) by use of force, especially as a way of reaching an alternate destination or as an act of terrorism.
b. To kidnap (a person in a vehicle): people who have experienced the trauma of being hijacked.
c. To stop and rob (a vehicle in transit).
d. To steal (goods) from a vehicle in transit.
2.
a. To take control of (something) without permission or authorization and use it for one's own purposes: dissidents who hijacked the town council; spammers who hijacked a computer network.
b. To steal or appropriate for oneself: hijacked her story and used it in his own book.
n.
The act or an instance of hijacking.

[Probably back-formation from highjacker, perhaps from jacker, holdup man, from jack, to jacklight.]

hi′jack′er n.

hijacking

or

highjacking

n
the act or an instance of hijacking
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hijacking - robbery of a traveller or vehicle in transit or seizing control of a vehicle by the use of forcehijacking - robbery of a traveller or vehicle in transit or seizing control of a vehicle by the use of force
robbery - larceny by threat of violence
buccaneering, piracy - hijacking on the high seas or in similar contexts; taking a ship or plane away from the control of those who are legally entitled to it; "air piracy"
Translations

hijacking

[ˈhaɪdʒækɪŋ] Nsecuestro m (fig) → apropiación f

hijacking

[ˈhaɪdʒækɪŋ] n [plane] → détournement m; [train] → attaque f
car hijackings → vols mpl de voitures avec violence

hijacking

[ˈhaɪˌdʒækɪŋ] npirateria aerea; (incident) → dirottamento
References in periodicals archive ?
Hijackings were rare until the Cuban revolution prompted Americans to begin hijacking planes to get to Cuba.
Between 1968 and 1972, airliner hijackings were commonplace around the world, occurring almost weekly in the United States alone.
Dan Plato, Western Cape MEC of Community Safety, will host an open-air safety talk in Stellenbosch following a spate of violent hijackings in the area.
The Security Spokesman of the Ministry of Interior said that within the framework of efforts by the Supreme Executive Committee on Dealing with Plane Hijacking in the kingdom with the aim of increasing the readiness of the security teams specialized in dealing with cases of plane hijackings at the Saudi airports, a simulated trial of hijacking a plane was conducted at King Khalid International Airport in Riyadh.
Patrols by European Union warships since December 2008 to deter hijackings have done little to dent the enthusiasm for piracy among Somalis.
The alternative shipping route has lowered the frequency of hijackings, but there have still been three boats captured this month.
With increased security measures after 9/11, it would seem, thankfully, hijackings are at worst, a rare occurrence, but in the past Britain's special forces were dispatched to the scene of a hijacking to resolve the stand-off when negotiations broke down.
Authorities say the system is a foolproof way to ensure aircraft have not been commandeered, but some experts say it is based on assumptions that hijackings occur in certain ways.
Yet Davis was pegged "Crazy Ed" for his shoot-from-the-hip remarks, the most memorable in 1972 in reaction to a spate of hijackings across the nation.
A previously undisclosed report of the 9/11 Commission shows that in the months prior to September 11,2001 terrorist attacks, Federal Aviation Administration officials reviewed dozens of intelligence reports concerning Osama bin Laden and al-Qaeda, some of which specifically discussed airline hijackings and suicide operations.
Finnish-Swedish telecomms operator TeliaSonera AB said on Wednesday (9 June) that its Swedish subsidiary TeliaSonera Sweden (Telia) had taken another step in the fight against modem hijackings by calling and warning customers who might have been affected by hijackings.
Mohammed also divulged that, in its final stages, the hijacking plan called for as many as 22 terrorists and four planes in a first wave, followed by a second wave of suicide hijackings that were to be aided possibly by al Qaida allies in Southeast Asia.