Hildegard of Bingen


Also found in: Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Hildegard of Bingen

(ˈhɪldəɡɑːd; ˈbɪŋən)
n
(Biography) Saint. 1098–1179, German abbess, poet, composer, and mystic
References in periodicals archive ?
Their topics include the impact of bilingualism and diglossia in Cantabria (Spain) during Late Antiquity, the power of multilingualism in the voices of Hildegard of Bingen, vernacular bilingualism in professional spaces 1200 to 1400, apothecary's art as a contact zone in Late Medieval southern France, bilingualism and multilingualism in the early English ballad: Francophone influences in the development of the ballad genre in Medieval England, and how Fray Bernardino Sahagun's trilingualism missed the mark in New Spain.
Hildegard of Bingen and Musical Reception: The Modern Revival of a Medieval Composer.
Hildegard of Bingen was a Benedictine abbess born in Germany at the end of the 11th century.
Hildegard of Bingen (1098-1179) was a visionary, an abbess, a composer, a dramatist, a poet and a healer.
In the final essay, Honey Meconi documents the long and fascinating publishing history of the music of Hildegard of Bingen, one of today's icons of musical faith.
But before Francis there was Hildegard of Bingen (1098-1179), a Benedictine abbess, preacher, writer, musician, mystic, scholar, scientist, environmentalist, healer.
Kienzle, Beverly Mayne, Hildegard of Bingen and her Gospel Homilies: Speaking New Mysteries (Medieval Women: Texts and Contexts, 12), Turnhout, Brepols, 2009; hardback; pp.
The women she focuses on -- Hildegard of Bingen, Catherine of Siena, Teresa of Avila, and Therese of Lisieux -- were controversial and admired figures even in their days, women who challenged boundaries and pushed theological notions in exciting new directions.
Vocals soon enter the meditative picture of the song, "Ong Namo-Harnam," with Ashana singing in a melodic style drawing on music from the Middle Ages, reminding my ears of Hildegard of Bingen.
These fourteen essays include how much we know about Jutta and Hildegard at Disibodeberg and Rupertsberg, reform in Germany from 1080 to 1180, Elisabeth of Schonan, the schools and the critiques, claims to Hildegard's prophetic authority, Hildegard's musical work uncovered, musical hagiography, the theory of repentance, medical magical miracles, and the history of reception of Hildegard of Bingen, Particularly interesting are the notes on Hildegard's unknown, private language and writing.
From Hippocrates of Ancient Greece, whose principled oath remains an integral part of medical practice to this day, to medieval abbess Hildegard of Bingen, Arabs Ibn Sina and Al-Razi, Renaissance scholar of anatomy Andreas Vesalius, Edward Jenner (known as "the father of immunology" for his inventions of inoculation and the smallpox vaccine) and many more, Great Men and Women in the History of Medicine examines a wide array of dedicated individuals whose work has saved countless lives through the centuries.