Hildegard of Bingen


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Hildegard of Bingen

(ˈhɪldəɡɑːd; ˈbɪŋən)
n
(Biography) Saint. 1098–1179, German abbess, poet, composer, and mystic
References in periodicals archive ?
This positive appropriation of the virgin martyr continues in the work of Hildegard of Bingen.
One lacuna in Martin's article: Contrary to his assertion (108), at least one medieval thinker, Hildegard of Bingen, did use the parallel of a male Christ (the priest) and a female Church (the congregation) to justify and explain the exclusion of women from priestly orders.
Called A New Heaven, the late-evening concert (starting time 9pm) will feature 1,000 years of sacred music, from Hildegard of Bingen to Jonathan Harvey, taking in Rachmaninov and Samuel Barber among many others along the way, as well as the anthem by Edgar Bainton which gives the programme its name.
Hildegard of Bingen, the 12th-century German mystic and ecologist, didn't have the Hubble Space Telescope or quantum physics at her disposal.
It's like opening your mind and heart--indeed, the pores of your body--to the mystery that lies deep behind and inside everyday reality I read Thomas Merton saying that ordinary work is prayer and Hildegard of Bingen praising the sacredness of "green" life, nature itself.
In fact, it was while he was driving the taxi that he heard the broadcast by Gothic Voices which planted the seed for that landmark Hildegard of Bingen disc.
Hildegard of Bingen, has taken on the story of another influential woman, the philosopher and political theorist Hannah Arendt (1906-75).
Each chapter focusses on the life and work of one woman composer, beginning with Hildegard of Bingen (Germany), born 1098, and ending with Judith Lang Zaimont (Memphis, Tennessee), born 1945.
I know you have a deep interest in the Divine Feminine and the women mystics of the Church, and have just finished a new book on Hildegard of Bingen, an amazing German Catholic abbess of the 12th century.
The first volume of the letters of Hildegard of Bingen (letters I-XC), edited by Lieven Van Acker, was published as Corpus Christianorum Continuatio Mediaevalis vol.
Hildegard of Bingen, along with a discussion of her writings and compositions.
His greatest single success is A Feather on the Breath of God, music by the mediaeval nun, Hildegard of Bingen.