hill

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hill

 (hĭl)
n.
1. A well-defined natural elevation smaller than a mountain.
2. A small heap, pile, or mound.
3.
a. A mound of earth piled around and over a plant.
b. A plant thus covered.
4. An incline, especially of a road; a slope.
5. Hill
a. Capitol Hill. Often used with the.
b. The US Congress. Often used with the.
tr.v. hilled, hill·ing, hills
1. To form into a hill, pile, or heap.
2. To cover (a plant) with a mound of soil.
Idiom:
over the hill Informal
Past one's prime.

[Middle English hil, from Old English hyll; see kel- in Indo-European roots.]

hill′er n.

hill

(hɪl)
n
1. (Physical Geography)
a. a conspicuous and often rounded natural elevation of the earth's surface, less high or craggy than a mountain
b. (in combination): a hillside; a hilltop.
2.
a. a heap or mound made by a person or animal
b. (in combination): a dunghill.
3. an incline; slope
4. informal beyond one's prime
5. (Military) military slang absent without leave or deserting
6. up hill and down dale strenuously and persistently
vb (tr)
7. to form into a hill or mound
8. (Botany) to cover or surround with a mound or heap of earth
[Old English hyll; related to Old Frisian holla head, Latin collis hill, Low German hull hill]
ˈhiller n
ˈhilly adj

Hill

(hɪl)
n
1. (Biography) Archibald Vivian. 1886–1977, British biochemist, noted for his research into heat loss in muscle contraction: shared the Nobel prize for physiology or medicine (1922)
2. (Biography) Damon Graham Devereux, son of Graham Hill. born 1960, British motor-racing driver; Formula One world champion (1996)
3. (Biography) David Octavius 1802–70, Scottish painter and portrait photographer, noted esp for his collaboration with the chemist Robert Adamson (1821–48)
4. (Biography) Sir Geoffrey (William). born 1932, British poet: his books include King Log (1968), Mercian Hymns (1971), The Mystery of the Charity of Charles Péguy (1983), and The Orchards of Syon (2002)
5. (Biography) Graham. 1929–75, British motor-racing driver: world champion (1962, 1968)
6. (Biography) Octavia. 1838–1912, British housing reformer; a founder of the National Trust
7. (Biography) Sir Rowland. 1795–1879, British originator of the penny postage
8. (Biography) Susan (Elizabeth). born 1942, British novelist and writer of short stories: her books include I'm the King of the Castle (1970) The Woman in Black (1983), and Felix Derby (2002)

hill

(hɪl)

n., v. hilled, hill•ing. n.
1. a natural elevation of the earth's surface, smaller than a mountain.
2. an incline, esp. in a road.
3. an artificial heap, pile, or mound.
4.
a. a mound of earth raised about and above a plant or plant cluster.
b. a cluster of plants within such a mound.
5. the Hill,
v.t.
6. to surround with hills.
7. to form into a hill or heap.
Idioms:
over the hill, advanced in age; past one's prime.
[before 1000; Middle English; Old English hyll, c. Middle Dutch hille; akin to Gothic hallus rock, Latin collis hill]
hill′er, n.

Hill

(hɪl)

n.
1. James Jerome, 1838–1916, U.S. railroad builder and financier, born in Canada.
2. Joe, 1879–1915, U.S. labor organizer and songwriter, born in Sweden.

Hill

 a heap of earth raised about the root of crops, hence, the crops themselves; an enormous mass or quantity.
Examples: hill of corn, 1817; of fire, 1320; of guilt, 1644; of knowledge, 1851; of dead men, 1450; of potatoes, 1799; of proud and rich folk, 1440; of ruffs [bird of the sandpiper family], 1875; of snow, 1784; of heavenly truth, 1644.

hill


Past participle: hilled
Gerund: hilling

Imperative
hill
hill
Present
I hill
you hill
he/she/it hills
we hill
you hill
they hill
Preterite
I hilled
you hilled
he/she/it hilled
we hilled
you hilled
they hilled
Present Continuous
I am hilling
you are hilling
he/she/it is hilling
we are hilling
you are hilling
they are hilling
Present Perfect
I have hilled
you have hilled
he/she/it has hilled
we have hilled
you have hilled
they have hilled
Past Continuous
I was hilling
you were hilling
he/she/it was hilling
we were hilling
you were hilling
they were hilling
Past Perfect
I had hilled
you had hilled
he/she/it had hilled
we had hilled
you had hilled
they had hilled
Future
I will hill
you will hill
he/she/it will hill
we will hill
you will hill
they will hill
Future Perfect
I will have hilled
you will have hilled
he/she/it will have hilled
we will have hilled
you will have hilled
they will have hilled
Future Continuous
I will be hilling
you will be hilling
he/she/it will be hilling
we will be hilling
you will be hilling
they will be hilling
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been hilling
you have been hilling
he/she/it has been hilling
we have been hilling
you have been hilling
they have been hilling
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been hilling
you will have been hilling
he/she/it will have been hilling
we will have been hilling
you will have been hilling
they will have been hilling
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been hilling
you had been hilling
he/she/it had been hilling
we had been hilling
you had been hilling
they had been hilling
Conditional
I would hill
you would hill
he/she/it would hill
we would hill
you would hill
they would hill
Past Conditional
I would have hilled
you would have hilled
he/she/it would have hilled
we would have hilled
you would have hilled
they would have hilled
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hill - a local and well-defined elevation of the landhill - a local and well-defined elevation of the land; "they loved to roam the hills of West Virginia"
butte - a hill that rises abruptly from the surrounding region; has a flat top and sloping sides
foothill - a relatively low hill on the lower slope of a mountain
hillside - the side or slope of a hill
hammock, hillock, hummock, knoll, mound - a small natural hill
natural elevation, elevation - a raised or elevated geological formation
tor - a high rocky hill
2.hill - structure consisting of an artificial heap or bank usually of earth or stones; "they built small mounds to hide behind"
barbette - (formerly) a mound of earth inside a fort from which heavy gun can be fired over the parapet
burial mound, grave mound, tumulus, barrow - (archeology) a heap of earth placed over prehistoric tombs
embankment - a long artificial mound of stone or earth; built to hold back water or to support a road or as protection
snow bank, snowbank - a mound or heap of snow
structure, construction - a thing constructed; a complex entity constructed of many parts; "the structure consisted of a series of arches"; "she wore her hair in an amazing construction of whirls and ribbons"
3.hill - United States railroad tycoon (1838-1916)Hill - United States railroad tycoon (1838-1916)
4.Hill - risque English comedian (1925-1992)
5.hill - (baseball) the slight elevation on which the pitcher standshill - (baseball) the slight elevation on which the pitcher stands
baseball, baseball game - a ball game played with a bat and ball between two teams of nine players; teams take turns at bat trying to score runs; "he played baseball in high school"; "there was a baseball game on every empty lot"; "there was a desire for National League ball in the area"; "play ball!"
baseball diamond, infield, diamond - the area of a baseball field that is enclosed by 3 bases and home plate
baseball equipment - equipment used in playing baseball
Verb1.hill - form into a hill
shape, mould, mold, form, forge, work - make something, usually for a specific function; "She molded the rice balls carefully"; "Form cylinders from the dough"; "shape a figure"; "Work the metal into a sword"

hill

noun
1. mount, down (archaic), fell, height, mound, prominence, elevation, eminence, hilltop, tor, knoll, hillock, brae (Scot.), kopje or koppie (S. African) They climbed to the top of the hill.
2. slope, incline, gradient, rise, climb, brae (Scot.), acclivity the shady street that led up the hill to the office building
3. heap, pile, mound, hummock an ant hill
over the hill (Informal) too old, getting on, ancient, past it (informal), senile, decrepit, past your prime He doesn't take kindly to suggestions that he is over the hill.

hill

noun
1. A natural land elevation:
2. A group of things gathered haphazardly:
verb
To put into a disordered pile:
Translations
kopecstoupánívrch
bakkehøj
monteto
mägi
mäkikukkula
पहाड़ी
brdobrijeg
bukit
hæîhlíî, brekka
언덕
collis
atšlaitėįkalnėkalvakalvelėkalvotas
nogāze
deal
kopčekkopcovitýkopec
hrib
backe
kilima
เขาเตี้ยๆ
đồi

hill

[hɪl]
A. N (gen) → colina f, cerro m, loma f (esp LAm); (high) → montaña f; (= slope) → cuesta f
a house at the top of a hilluna casa en lo alto de una colina
I climbed the hill up to the officesubí la cuesta hasta la oficina the hillsla montaña fsing, la sierra fsing
to be over the hillir cuesta abajo
to chase sb up hill and down daleperseguir a algn por todas partes
to take to the hillsecharse al monte
as old as the hillsmás viejo que Matusalén
B. CPD hill climb N (Sport) → ascensión f de montaña
hill farmer Nagricultor(a) m/f de montaña
hill farming Nagricultura f de montaña
hill walker Nmontañero/a m/f, senderista mf
hill walking Nmontañismo m, senderismo m
to go hill-walkinghacer montañismo, hacer senderismo

hill

[ˈhɪl] n
(= high ground) → colline f
She walked up the hill → Elle a gravi la colline., Elle a monté la colline.
as old as the hills → vieux comme Hérode
to be over the hill → être dépassé(e)
(= incline) (on road)côte f

hill

n
Hügel m; (higher) → Berg m; (= incline)Hang m; the castle stands on a hilldas Schloss steht auf einem Berg; the houses on the hill beneath the castledie Häuser am Schlossberg; these flats are built on a hilldiese Wohnungen sind am Hang or Berg gebaut; to park on a hillam Berg parken; you hardly feel the hills in this carin diesem Auto spürt man die Steigungen kaum; up hill and down dalebergauf und bergab; as old as the hillssteinalt, uralt; that joke’s as old as the hillsder Witz hat ja so einen langen Bart; to take to the hillssich in die Berge flüchten; to be over the hill (fig inf)seine beste Zeit or die besten Jahre hinter sich (dat)haben

hill

:
hillside
nHang m
hilltop
nGipfel m
hill-walker
nBergwanderer m, → Bergwanderin f
hill-walking
nBergwandern nt

hill

[hɪl] ncollina; (lower) → colle m; (slope) → pendio, costa
up hill and down dale → per monti e per valli
to be over the hill (fig) (fam) → essere sul viale del tramonto
as old as the hills → vecchio/a come Matusalemme

hill

(hil)
1. noun a piece of high land, smaller than a mountain. We went for a walk in the hills yesterday.
2. a slope on a road. This car has difficulty going up steep hills.
ˈhillock (-lək) noun
a small hill.
ˈhilly adjective
having many hills. hilly country.
ˈhillside noun
the side or slope of a hill. The hillside was covered with new housing.

hill

تَلّ kopec bakke Hügel λόφος colina mäki colline brdo collina 언덕 heuvel ås wzgórze colina холм backe เขาเตี้ยๆ tepe đồi 小山
References in periodicals archive ?
Letter of Announcement:general contract for Reconstruction of classroom wing at Hilles Tveit Skule.
The Susan Morse Hilles Curator of Paintings & Sculpture, this robust exhibition was inspired by the recent historic reconstruction of the Hermione, the Frigate of Freedom, that delivered the young Marquis de Lafayette in 1780 to General Washington with full French aid.
Dearinger, the Susan Morse Hilles curator of paintings & sculpture and director of exhibitions at the Boston Athenaeum, will offer an analysis of the historical and artistic significance of the first school of American painting.
This brooke riseth, as some say, four or five miles above Bermingham, towards Black Hilles.
In 1920, the superb mansion became the property of the D'Arcy Hilles family from Baltimore and during the Second World War it was requisitioned and successively used by the German and the American armies.
Detmar Blow has been the custodian of Hilles House for 27 years.
Arafat Hilles, Assistant Professor, Al-Quds Open University
On their wheel loaders, for example, gears 2 and 4 wear out first, and Hilles can choose to replace only the worn gear wheels.
Hilles and Harold Bloom (New York: Oxford University Press, 1965), 527-59.
Also, Mazzeo, Hilles, and Zyontz [2011] analyze the data used in PWC [2009] and report no systematic upward bias in patent damage awards.
Hilles corralled regular Republicans into a firm organization, and, as Gould describes, Taft's tour cemented his hold on the party for 1912.
60) Susan Ensign Hilles, born in 1933, had two "tricks" according to her mother: playing patty-cake and pointing to her curls when asked.