hind


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hind 1

 (hīnd) also hind·er (hīn′dər)
adj.
Located at or forming the back or rear; posterior: an animal's hind legs; the hinder part of a steer.

[Middle English hinde, short for bihinde, behind, from Old English bihindan; see ko- in Indo-European roots.]

hind 2

 (hīnd)
n.
1. A female red deer.
2. Any of various spotted groupers of the genus Epinephelus or various related fishes of the genus Cephalopholis.

[Middle English, from Old English.]

hind 3

 (hīnd)
n.
1. Chiefly British A farm laborer, especially a skilled worker.
2. Archaic A country bumpkin; a rustic.

[Alteration of Middle English hine, household servants, possibly from Old English hīne, genitive of hīgan, hīwan, members of a household; see kei- in Indo-European roots.]

hind

(haɪnd)
adj, hinder, hindmost or hindermost
(prenominal) (esp of parts of the body) situated at the back or rear: a hind leg.
[Old English hindan at the back, related to German hinten; see behind, hinder2]

hind

(haɪnd)
n, pl hinds or hind
1. (Animals) the female of the deer, esp the red deer when aged three years or more
2. (Animals) any of several marine serranid fishes of the genus Epinephelus, closely related and similar to the gropers
[Old English hind; related to Old High German hinta, Greek kemas young deer, Lithuanian szmúlas hornless]

hind

(haɪnd)
(formerly) n
1. (Historical Terms) a simple peasant
2. (Agriculture) (in N Britain) a skilled farm worker
3. (Historical Terms) a steward
[Old English hīne, from hīgna, genitive plural of hīgan servants]

hind1

(haɪnd)

adj.
situated in the rear or at the back; posterior: the hind legs of an animal.
[1300–50; Middle English hinde; compare Old English hindan (adv.) from behind, at the back, c. Old High German hintana, Gothic hindana; compare behind, hinder2]
syn: See back1.

hind2

(haɪnd)

n., pl. hinds, (esp. collectively) hind.
1. the female of the European red deer in and after the third year.
2. any of various groupers of the genus Epinephelus, of warm Atlantic seas, as the orange-speckled E. adscensionis (rock hind).
[before 900; Middle English, Old English, c. Middle Dutch hinde, Old High German hinta]

hind3

(haɪnd)

n.
1. a peasant; rustic.
2. Chiefly Scot. a farm laborer.
[before 1000; alter. of Middle English hine (pl.) servants, Old English (Anglian) hīne,hī(g)na, genitive of hīgan (West Saxon hīwan) members of a household; compare hide3]

Hind.

1. Hindu.
2. Hindustan.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hind - any of several mostly spotted fishes that resemble groupers
grouper - usually solitary bottom sea basses of warm seas
Epinephelus, genus Epinephelus - genus of groupers or sea bass
Epinephelus adscensionis, rock hind - found around rocky coasts or on reefs
2.hind - a female deer, especially an adult female red deer
Cervus elaphus, red deer, wapiti, American elk, elk - common deer of temperate Europe and Asia
Adj.1.hind - located at or near the back of an animalhind - located at or near the back of an animal; "back (or hind) legs"; "the hinder part of a carcass"
posterior - located at or near or behind a part or near the end of a structure

hind

adjective back, rear, hinder, posterior, caudal (Anatomy) Suddenly the cow kicked up its hind legs.

hind

adjective
Located in the rear:
Nautical: after.
Translations
أيْلَه، أنثى الأيِّلخَلْفي
laňzadní
bag-hind
aftur-hind
briežu māte
laň
arkaartdişi geyik

hind

1 [haɪnd] ADJ [leg, foot] → trasero, posterior
he could talk the hind leg(s) off a donkey (Brit) → habla hasta por los codos

hind

2 [haɪnd] N (hinds or hind (pl)) → cierva f

hind

[ˈhaɪnd]
adj [legs] → de derrière
he could talk the hind legs off a donkey → c'est un vrai moulin à paroles
nbiche f

hind

:
hindmost
adj superl of hind2hinterste(r, s)
hindquarters
plHinterteil nt; (of carcass)Hinterviertel nt; (of horse)Hinterhand f

hind

1
n (Zool) → Hirschkuh f, → Hindin f (poet)

hind

2
adjHinter-; hind legsHinterbeine pl; hind feetHinterfüße pl; hind pawsHinterpfoten pl; the horse reared up on its hind legsdas Pferd bäumte sich auf; he can or could talk the hind leg(s) off a donkey (inf)er kann einem ein Ohr or die Ohren abreden (inf)

hind

1 [haɪnd] adj (leg) → posteriore
he would talk the hind leg off a donkey (fam) → parla come una macchinetta

hind

2 [haɪnd] n (Zool) → cerva

hind1

(haind) noun
a female deer, especially of the red deer.

hind2

(haind) adjective
at the back (usually of an animal). a hind leg.
References in classic literature ?
Something had to drive him out of the New York room to live out his life an obscure, jerky little fig- ure, bobbing up and down on the streets of an Ohio town at evening when the sun was going down be- hind the roof of Wesley Moyer's livery barn.
The dogs were out, as usual, dozens of them, sitting up on their hind legs over the doors of their houses.
Notwithstanding a constant application of his one armed heel to the flanks of the mare, the most confirmed gait that he could establish was a Canterbury gallop with the hind legs, in which those more forward assisted for doubtful moments, though generally content to maintain a loping trot.
More frequently, however, on ascending the steps, you would discern -- in the entry if it were summer time, or in their appropriate rooms if wintry or inclement weathers row of venerable figures, sitting in old-fashioned chairs, which were tipped on their hind legs back against the wall.
Boys, you see, think a horse or pony is like a steam-engine or a thrashing-machine, and can go on as long and as fast as they please; they never think that a pony can get tired, or have any feelings; so as the one who was whipping me could not understand I just rose up on my hind legs and let him slip off behind -- that was all.
They had such headway that they were nearly to the king before they could check up; then, frantic with rage, they stood up their horses on their hind hoofs and whirled them around, and the next moment here they came, breast to breast.
So tomorrow I'll be up bright and early, make my little old collection, and mosey off to Tennessee, on my own hind legs, with a rousing good-by to Gadsby's.
In the midst of the prayer a fly had lit on the back of the pew in front of him and tortured his spirit by calmly rubbing its hands together, embracing its head with its arms, and polishing it so vigorously that it seemed to almost part company with the body, and the slender thread of a neck was exposed to view; scraping its wings with its hind legs and smoothing them to its body as if they had been coat-tails; going through its whole toilet as tranquilly as if it knew it was perfectly safe.
When Tom Sawyer seen a thing it just got up on its hind legs and TALKED to him--told him everything it knowed.
But none was made; and I became, at ten years old, a little labouring hind in the service of Murdstone and Grinby.
The wagons were outspanned side by side with a space between them, and into this space the mob of thirty-six oxen was driven and there secured by reims tied crosswise from the front and hind wheels of the wagons.
Why liest thou here, like a worn-out hind, when the Saxon storms thy place of strength?