Hindenburg line


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Hindenburg line

(ˈhɪndənˌbɜːɡ)
n
(Historical Terms) a line of strong fortifications built by the German army near the Franco-Belgian border in 1916–17: breached by the Allies in August 1918
[C20: named after Paul von Hindenburg]
References in periodicals archive ?
Edwin was also in one of the biggest battles of the nal days on the St Quentin Front as part of the heavy artillery engaged in the Shelling of the Hindenburg line between September 29 and October 10.
Muirhead, who died in 1953, visited the Western Front again in April 1917, this time at the desolate, ransacked and spoiled grounds left by the Germans after their retreat to the Hindenburg line.
October 5 | Last remnants of the formidable Hindenburg Line overrun by the allies.
Success and failure stories of battles like 46th (North Midland) Division breaking the Hindenburg Line, in September 1918 and Somme in 1916 are also mentioned in the documents.
During 1917 the division was involved in the German retreat to the Hindenburg Line and the Battles of Pilkem, the Menin Road, Poelcapelle, the first battle of Passchendaele and Cambrai.
In 1918 grandad was again fighting on the Somme and took part in the Second Battle of Arras and battles of the Hindenburg Line.
In March 1917 the Division followed the German Retreat to the Hindenburg Line, and in April they fought at Arras, during the First Battle of the Scarpe, the Battle of Arleux and the Third Battle of the Scarpe.
The soldiers were buried at Ecoust-St-Mein, outside Arras, close to where they fell in Bullecourt near the Hindenburg Line.
Its German defenders enjoyed a powerful advantage, which they had exploited skillfully by establishing three defensive belts in front of the main Hindenburg line.
An Australian historian specializing in the First World War, Blair describes how a combined Australian US force fought a series of battles on the Western Front that, though they did not break through the German line as hoped, eventually forced the Germans to abandon the Hindenburg Line.
When the Hindenburg Line was breached from Drocourt to Queant, the Germans fell back on the Canal du Nord, their next defensive line.
But the Germans were still not broken and the Allies knew they had a daunting task ahead of them as they prepared to break through the Hindenburg Line.