historical materialism

(redirected from Historical materialist)
Also found in: Encyclopedia.

historical materialism

n.
A major tenet in the Marxist theory of history that regards material economic forces as the base on which sociopolitical institutions and ideas are built.

historical materialism

n
(Sociology) the part of Marxist theory maintaining that social structures derive from economic structures and that these are transformed as a result of class struggles, each ruling class producing another, which will overcome and destroy it, the final phase being the emergence of a communist society

histor′ical mate′rialism


n.
the part of dialectical materialism dealing with historical process and social causation; the doctrine that social thought and institutions develop as a superstructure on an economic base.
[1920–25]
References in periodicals archive ?
In particular, Hennessey brings an historical materialist and feminist reading of sexuality, nonconforming sexual identity and gender in the affect culture of organizing in the maquilas.
His reading of the work of Karl Marx turned him into a life-long historical materialist who, until his death, was very sceptical of the system of market capitalism, which inevitably promotes greed, corruption and widens the gap between the rich and the poor.
My first move is to review the figuring of the commodity, in a consideration of colonial expropriation, through a different take on the historical materialist reading of slavery.
In this regard, if Cohle casts doubt on history, Pizzolatto might yet prove himself a historical materialist, in the sense that appearances may change, but only while internal structures stay the same, such that any story remains only that, and nothing all the more.
Frustrated by utopian promises of change, this debate reflects the impatience with historical materialist critiques such as dual systems theory as a means to revive feminism's revolutionary potential.
At the same time, the focus on the territoriality of the inter-state system in relation to the growth of capitalism has been a persistent theme within historical materialist discussions, but it has been plagued by marginalisation and lack of engagement from the mainstream.
Vernon Knight (Chapter 4) evaluates the limitations of the historical materialist approach as practiced in Cuba through ah insightful, critical review of the late pre-Hispanic/early Colonial site of Lomas del Convento, identified as the seat of the encomienda (centre subjecting local people to Spanish tule) of Fray Bartolome de Las Casas.
Inheritor of the critical traditions and historical materialist commitments of the Frankfurt School, Habermas in his many and varied inquiries has consistently sought to understand power, so as to champion both equality and diversity.
Lacsamana (women's studies, Hamilton College) examines the social position of Filipino women in the context of political instability and violence and de facto martial law in the Philippines, deploying a historical materialist analysis explicitly in opposition to the cultural or postmodern turn in Western feminist analysis in order to investigate issues of identity, migration, militarism, and prostitution, while foregrounding the grassroots anti-imperialist resistance conducted by such groups as GABRIELA (General Assembly Binding Women for Reforms, Equality, and Action), Migrante International, Task Force Subic Rape, and the Coalition Against Trafficking in Women.
Sparked by the recent global financial crisis (GFC), it is written from a critical perspective, in the framework of historical materialist political economy, addressing a number of issues which don't, or perhaps refuse to, fall into neat disciplinary boundaries.
The ten essays by Sean Kennedy, Ronan McDonald, David Lloyd, James McNaughton, Patrick Bixby, Victor Merriman, Sinead Mooney, Peter Boxall, Michael Wood, and Andrew Gibson cover an impressive array of periods and topics, which range from an examination of Beckett's critical reception in Irish studies to a discussion of the methodological advantages to be gained from a historical materialist turn in Beckett studies (following from transformations in Joyce studies).
The historical materialist methodological approach adopted by Thomas and now eschewed by the erstwhile Caribbean intellectual Left, is aptly employed here.
Full browser ?