Hobbes

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Hobbes

 (hŏbz), Thomas 1588-1679.
English philosopher and political theorist best known for his book Leviathan (1651), in which he argues that the only way to secure civil society is through universal submission to the absolute authority of a sovereign.

Hobbes′i·an adj.

Hobbes

(hɒbz)
n
(Biography) Thomas. 1588–1679, English political philosopher. His greatest work is the Leviathan (1651), which contains his defence of absolute sovereignty
ˈHobbesian n, adj

Hobbes

(hɒbz)

n.
Thomas, 1588–1679, English philosopher and author.
Hobbes′i•an, adj., n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Hobbes - English materialist and political philosopher who advocated absolute sovereignty as the only kind of government that could resolve problems caused by the selfishness of human beings (1588-1679)Hobbes - English materialist and political philosopher who advocated absolute sovereignty as the only kind of government that could resolve problems caused by the selfishness of human beings (1588-1679)
References in periodicals archive ?
So these are two equally unappetizing visions of the future: a military dictatorship backed by China and Russia floating as an outpost of their influence in the twilight of a brief American empire, or a Hobbesian free-for-all in a country under dismemberment.
It is no surprise that Hobbesian theories could be used both for and against the Stuart cause, but when Jackson writes that "Hobbes wrote Leviathan seemingly Janus-faced .
Claims that it cannot do so, he suggests, require a version of the Hobbesian fear.
It will require the Jewish communities of Judea and Samaria to make a Hobbesian choice between principle and peril.
Hate it or love it, the United Nations is widely associated with idealism in international relations, not state-centered Hobbesian realpolitik.
The contemporary problem, to my mind, is twofold: how to find unity in the midst of plurality and in the light of demise of any sufficiently powerful Hobbesian sovereign that will impose peace while stakes are getting higher.
The "moral" is Hobbesian (and perhaps reflective of the author's cynicism): Close personal relations can be a danger to independence and one should not expect to encounter many Cliffs in today's business world.
This sounds less like a plausible story about families than like a Hobbesian account of the origin of civil societies: independent agents range freely through the state of nature, pausing here and there to exercise.
From the Hobbesian perspective, trusting agents are not rational if their makeup discourages advantageous defection.
The egoism of Narveson's Hobbesian contract theory is nicely complemented by the individualism of his libertarian outlook.
We are squeezed at home, alone with Erdoy-an's Hobbesian state.
This reality takes us back to the Hobbesian notion of "all against all.