Holy Roman Empire


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Holy Roman Empire

A loosely federated central European political entity that began with the coronation of the German king Otto I as the first emperor in 962. The empire was long troubled, first by the conflict between papal and civil authority and later by religious strife and political fragmentation, and after the 1200s the emperors had little power in most of its constituent states. Upon Francis II's renunciation of his title at Napoleon's instigation in 1806, the empire ceased to exist.

Holy Roman Empire

n
(Historical Terms) the complex of European territories under the rule of the Frankish or German king who bore the title of Roman emperor, beginning with the coronation of Charlemagne in 800 ad. The last emperor, Francis II, relinquished his crown in 1806

Ho′ly Ro′man Em′pire


n.
a Germanic empire located chiefly in central Europe, considered as beginning with the coronation of Charlemagne in a.d. 800 or of Otto the Great in a.d. 962 and lasting until the renunciation of the crown by Francis II in 1806.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Holy Roman Empire - a political entity in Europe that began with the papal coronation of Otto I as the first emperor in 962 and lasted until 1806 when it was dissolved by NapoleonHoly Roman Empire - a political entity in Europe that began with the papal coronation of Otto I as the first emperor in 962 and lasted until 1806 when it was dissolved by Napoleon
political entity, political unit - a unit with political responsibilities
Europe - the 2nd smallest continent (actually a vast peninsula of Eurasia); the British use `Europe' to refer to all of the continent except the British Isles
References in classic literature ?
Count of the Holy Roman Empire, Knight Grand Cross of the Order of the Brazen Crown, Perpetual Arch-Master of the Rosicrucian Masons of Mesopotamia; Attached (in Honorary Capacities) to Societies Musical, Societies Medical, Societies Philosophical, and Societies General Benevolent, throughout Europe; etc.
The adage "The Holy Roman Empire was neither Holy nor Roman nor an Empire" has become so well known that it is often repeated as if it were a self-evident truth.
Heide Wunder provides a useful introduction to the studies that follow in her discussion of the role of the 'Furstin' at courts of the Holy Roman Empire from the sixteenth to the eighteenth century, as dynastic representative, maternal guardian, and cultural patron and participant.
After all, few historians spend a lot of time considering the Holy Roman Empire in the first place, so why "reconsider" it?
This is an amendment that does nothing for the voting public and only safeguards the needs of criminal politicians -- so, of course, it will likely be passed without dissent, even though it ought to fall into pieces just like Voltaire's Holy Roman Empire.
The topics include God's truth and the exercise of power, local knowledge and Catholic reform in early modern Spain, soul talk and reformation in England, reconfiguring Catholicism in the Holy Roman Empire, and what happened to Italian literature in the wake of the first index of prohibited books.
To call the latter the United Kingdom would be a repeat of the Holy Roman Empire, which was neither Holy, Roman nor an Empire.
Because of the city's relevance to the Holy Roman Empire, Hitler chose it as the site for Nazi party conventions.
Located on the North German Plain with only a small part of its heartland protected by mountains, 17th-century Poland allied with Lithuania and sought security through expansion at the expense of its then weakened neighbors: Russia and the Holy Roman Empire.
Liam Neeson - see Question 7 Holy Roman Empire in 800?
It's interesting to note that Germany, which gave us the Nazis and the Holocaust, is the most represented country on the disc, with six appearances, thanks mainly to Bach, Beethoven and Mozart, who was born into what was in his day the Holy Roman Empire of the German Nation.
The most successful and longest lasting polity, and the one which did most good and least harm, was the Holy Roman Empire traditionally dated to the coronation of Karl der Grosse (Charlemagne) by the Pope.