homer


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Ho·mer

 (hō′mər) fl. c. 750 bc.
Greek epic poet. Two of the greatest works in Western literature, the Iliad and the Odyssey, are attributed to him.

hom·er 1

 (hō′mər)
n.
1. Baseball A home run.
2. A homing pigeon.
intr.v. ho·mer·ed, ho·mer·ing, ho·mers Baseball
To hit a home run: homered in the fifth inning.

ho·mer 2

 (hō′mər)
n.
A unit of capacity used by the ancient Hebrews, equal to 10 ephahs (about 10 bushels) or 10 baths (about 100 gallons). Also called kor.

[Hebrew ḥōmer, heap, homer; see ḥmr in Semitic roots.]

homer

(ˈhəʊmə)
n
1. (Animals) another word for homing pigeon
2. (Baseball) US and Canadian an informal word for home run

Homer

(ˈhəʊmə)
n
1. (Biography) c. 800 bc, Greek poet to whom are attributed the Iliad and the Odyssey. Almost nothing is known of him, but it is thought that he was born on the island of Chios and was blind
2. (Biography) Winslow. 1836–1910, US painter, noted for his seascapes and scenes of working life

hom•er1

(ˈhoʊ mər)

n., v. -ered, -er•ing. n. v.i.
3. to hit a home run.
[1865–70; home + -er1]

ho•mer2

(ˈhoʊ mər)

n.
an ancient Hebrew unit of capacity equal to ten baths in liquid measure or ten ephahs in dry measure. Also called kor.
[1525–35; < Hebrew ḥōmer literally, heap]

Ho•mer

(ˈhoʊ mər)

n.
1. 9th-century B.C. Greek epic poet: reputed author of the Iliad and Odyssey.
2. Winslow, 1836–1910, U.S. artist.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.homer - a base hit on which the batter scores a runhomer - a base hit on which the batter scores a run
base hit, safety - (baseball) the successful act of striking a baseball in such a way that the batter reaches base safely
solo blast, solo homer - a home run with no runners on base
2.Homer - ancient Greek epic poet who is believed to have written the Iliad and the Odyssey (circa 850 BC)
3.homer - an ancient Hebrew unit of capacity equal to 10 baths or 10 ephahs
bath - an ancient Hebrew liquid measure equal to about 10 gallons
epha, ephah - an ancient Hebrew unit of dry measure equal to about a bushel
4.Homer - United States painter best known for his seascapes (1836-1910)
5.homer - pigeon trained to return homehomer - pigeon trained to return home  
domestic pigeon - domesticated pigeon raised for sport or food
carrier pigeon - a homing pigeon used to carry messages
Verb1.homer - hit a home run
rack up, score, tally, hit - gain points in a game; "The home team scored many times"; "He hit a home run"; "He hit .300 in the past season"
Translations
Homer
Homeros

Homer

[ˈhəʊməʳ] NHomero

homer

[ˈhəʊməʳ] N (Brit) → trabajo m fuera de hora, chollo m

Homer

nHomer m

homer

n
(= homing pigeon)Brieftaube f
(Brit inf: = job) → Nebenjob m (inf); to do something as a homeretw privat or nebenher machen

Homer

[ˈhəʊməʳ] nOmero
even Homer nods → errare humanum est
References in classic literature ?
For the medium being the same, and the objects the same, the poet may imitate by narration--in which case he can either take another personality as Homer does, or speak in his own person, unchanged--or he may present all his characters as living and moving before us.
If they continued to sing like their great predecessor of romantic themes, they were drawn as by a kind of magnetic attraction into the Homeric style and manner of treatment, and became mere echoes of the Homeric voice: in a word, Homer had so completely exhausted the epic genre, that after him further efforts were doomed to be merely conventional.
And we must beg Homer and the other poets not to be angry if we strike out these and similar passages, not because they are unpoetical, or unattractive to the popular ear, but because the greater the poetical charm of them, the less are they meet for the ears of boys and men who are meant to be free, and who should fear slavery more than death.
Then we will once more entreat Homer and the other poets not to depict Achilles, who is the son of a goddess, first lying on his side, then on his back, and then on his face; then starting up and sailing in a frenzy along the shores of the barren sea; now taking the sooty ashes in both his hands and pouring them over his head, or weeping and wailing in the various modes which Homer has delineated.
Then we shall not suffer such an expression to be used about the gods as that of Homer when he describes how
Then we shall approve such language as that of Diomede in Homer,
Moreover, the noble but direct and simple spirit and language of Homer were as different as possible from the spirit and language of the London drawing-rooms for which Pope wrote; hence he not only expands, as every author of a verse-translation must do in filling out his lines, but inserts new ideas of his own and continually substitutes for Homer's expressions the periphrastic and, as he held, elegant ones of the pseudo-classic diction.
The publication of Pope's Homer marks an important stage in the development of authorship.
It was a mirror in a drawing-room, but it gave back a faithful image of society, powdered and rouged, to be sure, and intent on trifles, yet still as human in its own way as the heroes of Homer in theirs, though not broadly human.
I wish, likewise, with all my heart, that Homer could have known the rule prescribed by Horace, to introduce supernatural agents as seldom as possible.
A modern may with much more elegance invoke a ballad, as some have thought Homer did, or a mug of ale, with the author of Hudibras; which latter may perhaps have inspired much more poetry, as well as prose, than all the liquors of Hippocrene or Helicon.
I proposed that Homer and Aristotle might appear at the head of all their commentators; but these were so numerous, that some hundreds were forced to attend in the court, and outward rooms of the palace.