Homestead Act

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Homestead Act

n.
An act passed by Congress in 1862 enabling persons who settled on undeveloped 160-acre tracts of land to gain title after meeting certain criteria, such as residing on and cultivating the land for five years after the initial claim.

Homestead Act

n
1. (Law) an act passed by the US Congress in 1862 making available to settlers 160-acre tracts of public land for cultivation
2. (Law) (in Canada) a similar act passed by the Canadian Parliament in 1872

Home′stead Act`


n.
a special act of Congress (1862) that made public lands in the West available to settlers without payment, usu. in lots of 160 acres, to be used as farms.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Homestead Act of 1862, signed by President Lincoln during the Civil War, had resulted in a massive expansion of the United State's western territories, drawing waves of European settlers to claim up to 160 acres of federal land for homesteading.
But the Homestead Act of 1862 and a dry grass year in the nearby Grande Ronde Valley a few years later brought settlers in.
Chapter four focuses on asset discrimination, commencing with Lincoln's Homestead Act of 1862, the sharecropper system, the Freedman's Bureau, the New Deal, and more modern issues with the Federal Housing Authority and the G.
After the riot, Fisher's parents took refuge in Chickasha, in southwest Oklahoma, where some Blacks had secured farmland under the Homestead Act of 1862.
It is 1,193 pages longer than the National Archive's parchment copy of the Homestead Act of 1862, which is one of the most important legislative acts in American history.