hemianopia

(redirected from Homonymous hemianopia)
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hemianopia

(ˌhɛmɪænˈəʊpɪə)
n
(Pathology) loss of vision in either the whole left or the whole right half of the field of vision. Also called: hemianopsia or hemiopia
[C19: from hemi- + an- + Greek opsis sight]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hemianopia - blindness in one half of the visual field of one or both eyeshemianopia - blindness in one half of the visual field of one or both eyes
vision defect, visual defect, visual disorder, visual impairment - impairment of the sense of sight
References in periodicals archive ?
Ninety percent of the patients had various clinical improvements, including improvements in visual acuity, homonymous hemianopia, and spinal-cord related manifestations.
Patients with homonymous hemianopia will often have subnormal color vision with standard testing methodologies.
unilateral paresis of arm and leg, Medical Research Council Scale 0-4), and (c) presence of at least 1 clinical sign of hemispheric involvement (aphasia, neglect, homonymous hemianopia, gaze deviation to the contralateral side of the hemiparesis, reduced level of consciousness).
Table 1: Classification of Stroke in the study * Stroke Classification Features Total anterior cerebral Deficits of higher cerebral function, infarct (TACI), homonymous hemianopia and ipsilateral hemiparesis with or without sensory loss.
According to clinical notes, two subjects (4 and 6) had visual field defects as a result of their stroke: subject 4 had a left inferior quadrantanopsia and subject 6 a left homonymous hemianopia.
failure to read words on the right side of the page) often accompany right homonymous hemianopia.
Potentially posterior cerebral artery occlusion resulting in a homonymous hemianopia.
VA of better than 6/60 with a very constricted visual field, especially in the lower part of the field (excluding people who suffer from homonymous hemianopia or bi-temporal hemianopia with VA better than 6/18).
If hemianopia occurs in both eyes, it is referred to as homonymous hemianopia.
So while homonymous hemianopia, hemianesthesia, hemiparesis, or other sensory and motor impairments may occur with UN, they do not cause UN and can be doubly disassociated from it.