mead

(redirected from Honey mead)
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mead 1

 (mēd)
n.
An alcoholic beverage made from fermented honey and water.

[Middle English mede, mead, from Old English medu, meodu; see medhu- in Indo-European roots.]

mead 2

 (mēd)
n. Archaic
A meadow.

[Middle English mede, from Old English mǣd; see mē- in Indo-European roots.]

mead

(miːd)
n
(Brewing) an alcoholic drink made by fermenting a solution of honey, often with spices added
[Old English meodu; related to Old High German metu, Greek methu, Welsh medd]

mead

(miːd)
n
(Physical Geography) an archaic or poetic word for meadow
[Old English mǣd]

Mead

(miːd)
n
(Placename) Lake Mead a reservoir in NW Arizona and SE Nevada, formed by the Hoover Dam across the Colorado River: one of the largest man-made lakes in the world. Area: 588 sq km (227 sq miles)

Mead

(miːd)
n
(Biography) Margaret. 1901–78, US anthropologist. Her works include Coming of Age in Samoa (1928) and Male and Female (1949)

mead1

(mid)

n.
an alcoholic drink of fermented honey and water.
[before 900; Old English me(o)du; c. Old High German metu, Skt madhu honey, Greek méthy wine]

mead2

(mid)

n. Archaic.
meadow.
[before 1000; Middle English mede, Old English mǣd]

Mead

(mid)

n.
1. Margaret, 1901–78, U.S. anthropologist.
2. Lake, a lake in NW Arizona and SE Nevada, formed by Hoover Dam on the Colorado River. 227 sq. mi. (588 sq. km).
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mead - United States anthropologist noted for her claims about adolescence and sexual behavior in Polynesian cultures (1901-1978)Mead - United States anthropologist noted for her claims about adolescence and sexual behavior in Polynesian cultures (1901-1978)
2.Mead - United States philosopher of pragmatism (1863-1931)
3.mead - made of fermented honey and watermead - made of fermented honey and water  
honey - a sweet yellow liquid produced by bees
brew, brewage - drink made by steeping and boiling and fermenting rather than distilling
metheglin - spiced or medicated mead
hydromel - honey diluted in water; becomes mead when fermented
Translations
medovina
mjød
mõdu
mjöður
はちみつ酒ミード
mjød
medovina
mjöd

mead

[miːd] Naguamiel f, hidromiel m

mead

[ˈmiːd] nhydromel m

mead

1
n (= drink)Met m

mead

2
n (old, poet)Aue f

mead

1 [miːd] nidromele m

mead

2 [miːd] n (liter) (meadow) → prato
References in periodicals archive ?
Also on offer will be award winning cheeses, free range hens' and ducks' eggs, fish and shellfish, fruit wines, ciders, beers and honey mead too along with handmade chocolates, soaps, jewellery and beautiful handmade baby knits from Isobel Thomson.
HONEY MEAD DATES BACK TO THE DAWN OF CIVILIZATION, but there is nothing antiquated about its place in the modern bar or restaurant.
The Krog Roba restaurant serves an intriguing buffet breakfast of classics, alongside local rice-based Karelian pastries and honey mead in cosy surroundings.
For example, African cultures, where our species began, are awash in sorghum and millet beers, honey mead and banana and palm wines.
Lying just off Princes Street - a Mecca of highstreet shops and cafes - the market offers mugs of mulled wine and honey mead as shoppers peruse the many stalls selling Christmas gifts.
They could go for Imbolc, the "festival of the lactating sheep", on February 1, where they may ask to be served roast boar, or Beltane, on May 1, which, in Old Celtic traditions was a time of unabashed promiscuity (I'm guessing warders throw open the showers and look away) when they may request honey mead.