orange roughy

(redirected from Hoplostethus atlanticus)
Related to Hoplostethus atlanticus: Slimehead

orange roughy

n.
A long-lived marine fish (Hoplostethus atlanticus) of deep cold waters, especially off the coasts of New Zealand and Australia, having a bright reddish body and fished commercially for food.

[orange (in reference to its color ) + roughy (probably from rough, in reference to the texture of its scales, perhaps also influenced by Australian English ruffy, roughy, ruff (the fish Arripis georgianus)).]

orange roughy

(ˈrʌfɪ)
n, pl roughies
(Animals) a marine food fish, Hoplosthenus atlanticus, of S Pacific waters
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References in periodicals archive ?
Finally, there is the example of deepwater fish such as orange roughy, Hoplostethus atlanticus, and Patagonian toothfish, Dissostichus eleginoides.
Spawning dynamics of orange roughy, Hoplostethus atlanticus, in mid-slope waters of New Zealand.
Genetic similarity between samples of the orange roughy, Hoplostethus atlanticus, from the Tasman Sea, southwest Pacific Ocean and north-east Atlantic Ocean.
Genetic similarity between samples of the orange roughy Hoplostethus atlanticus from the Tasman Sea, south-west Pacific Ocean and north-east Atlantic Ocean.
Alimentacion de orange roughy, Hoplostethus atlanticus (Pisces: Trachichthyidae), en el archipielago de Juan Fernandez, Chile.
1991) measured the loss of genetic diversity in the orange roughy, Hoplostethus atlanticus, as an integral consequence of heavy exploitation of natural populations.
Evaluating otolith age estimates for Hoplostethus atlanticus by comparing patterns of checks, cycles in microincrement width, and cycles in strontium and calcium composition.
An eco-morphological explanation of individual variability in the shape of the fish otolith: comparison of the otolith of Hoplostethus atlanticus with other species by depth.
In two of these three, the labels are consistent: series 9 and 15 (both of which were deepwater surveys targeting orange roughy, Hoplostethus atlanticus, in different areas) agree in finding catchability to be high in winter 1984 and low in winter 1989.