hot spot

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hot spot

or hot·spot  (hŏt′spŏt′)
n.
1. An area in which there is dangerous unrest or hostile action: "opportunities ... for United Nations forces to play a constructive role in some of the world's hot spots" (Paul Lewis).
2. Informal A lively and popular place, such as a nightclub.
3. An area of intense heat, radiation, or activity.
4. A location where Wi-Fi is publicly available.

hot spot

or

hotspot

n
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) an area of potential violence or political unrest
2. a lively nightclub or other place of entertainment
3. an area of great activity of a specific type: the world's economic hot spots.
4. (Automotive Engineering)
a. any local area of high temperature in a part of an engine, etc
b. part of the inlet manifold of a paraffin engine that is heated by exhaust gases to vaporize the fuel
5. (Computer Science) computing a place where wireless internet, esp broadband, services are provided to users of portable computers through a wireless local area network, such as in an airport, railway station, or library
6. (Pathology) med
a. a small area on the surface of or within a body with an exceptionally high concentration of radioactivity or of some chemical or mineral considered harmful
b. a similar area that generates an abnormal amount of heat, as revealed by thermography
7. (Genetics) genetics a part of a chromosome that has a tendency for mutation or recombination

hot′ spot`

or hot′spot`,


n.
1. a country or region where dangerous or difficult political situations exist or may develop.
2. any area or place of known danger, instability, etc.
3. Informal. a nightclub.
4. a chromosome site or a section of DNA having a high frequency of mutation.
[1925–30, Amer.]

hot spot

(hŏt)
A volcanic area, usually 60 to 120 miles (97 to 193 kilometers) across, believed to lie above a rising plume of hot magma within the Earth. The source of the heat is thought to be the decay of radioactive elements deep within the Earth. The Hawaiian Islands are believed to have formed as the result of a tectonic plate moving over a hot spot. See more at tectonic boundary.

hot spot

Region in a contaminated area in which the level of radioactive contamination is considerably greater than in neighboring regions in the area.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hot spot - a place of political unrest and potential violence; "the United States cannot police all of the world's hot spots"
2.hot spot - a point of relatively intense heat or radiation
point - the precise location of something; a spatially limited location; "she walked to a point where she could survey the whole street"
3.hot spot - a lively entertainment spot
spot - a business establishment for entertainment; "night spot"

hot spot

noun
A difficult, often embarrassing situation or condition:
Informal: bind, pickle, spot.
Translations
zone d'accès sans fil

hot spot

n (fig) → zona calda
References in periodicals archive ?
USA], Aug 20 (ANI): Through analysis of volcanic tracks, a team of researchers has found that hot spots like those that formed the Hawaiian Islands do not move as quickly as previously thought.
Detailing the incidence of pests in different cotton growing districts, officials said that varying number of hot spots of white fly, Jassid, Mealy Bug, Thrips, armyworm, and Cotton Leaf Curl Virus were reported from different districts of the cotton belt.
MULTAN -- Agriculture experts have advised farmers to perform pest scouting of cotton crop twice a week pleading that officials have noticed hot spots of pests and bollworms in some parts of cotton zone districts of Punjab.
Hot spots and the edges of tectonic plates are two sites where volcanoes often form.
Hot spots are the same thickness as the surrounding skin (not mounded), and the surrounding skin looks normal.
Lynda Gratton has spent a decade uncovering and analyzing what contributes to Hot Spots: her research has uncovered four basic qualities and organization needs to support the creation of Hot Spots of excitement and cooperation.
Valley police resources, from motor to vice cops, have been refocused on the violence and extra squads from south of Mulholland -- where gangs got their first toehold -- are being deployed in Valley hot spots.
It allows the user to move between a 3G network, private and free Wi-Fi signals and a commercial Wi-Fi hot spots network, for a monthly fee.
Because hot spots lie deep within Earth, researchers who developed the mantle-plume hypothesis had a tough time convincing skeptical colleagues.
cholerae and R391 of Providencia rettgeri (5), showed that the conserved backbone apparently contains 3 hot spots for insertions of additional DNA sequences: the first between sO43 and traL, the second between trA and sO54, and the third between sO73 and traF.
Lai of the University of Hong Kong and colleagues show how GIS technology can be used during an acute infectious disease outbreak to reveal crucial real-time, quantitative information, such as the direction of superspreading events (in which one person infects more than the typical three or fewer others) and distinct disease hot spots [EHP 112:1550-1556].
From more than 5,000 reported last year, over 42,000 Hot Spots are estimated by year end 2004 in the US alone, serving as many as 27 million customers and generating more than $9 billion in annual revenue.