House of Lords


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House of Lords

n. Abbr. HL
The upper house of Parliament in the United Kingdom, made up of members of the nobility and high-ranking clergy.

House of Lords

n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) (in Britain) the upper chamber of Parliament, composed of the peers of the realm

House′ of Lords′


n.
the nonelective upper house of the British Parliament.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.House of Lords - the upper house of the British parliament
house - an official assembly having legislative powers; "a bicameral legislature has two houses"
British Parliament - the British legislative body
peer of the realm - a peer who is entitled to sit in the House of Lords
Translations
Sněmovna lordů
Cámera de los Lores

House of Lords

n (Brit) the House of Lordsla Camera dei Lords
References in classic literature ?
He fell down on the floor of the House of Lords after uttering almost his dying words in defence of our privileges as freemen.
In Great Britain it is the province of the House of Commons to prefer the impeachment, and of the House of Lords to decide upon it.
May I ask, Lord Illingworth, if you regard the House of Lords as a better institution than the House of Commons?
Whilst the House of Lords exists," she remarked, "you will never succeed in keeping Algernon away from London.
And in London another Lord Greystoke was speaking to HIS kind in the House of Lords, but none trembled at the sound of his soft voice.
The councils were held in great state, for every member felt as if sitting in parliament, and every retainer and dependent looked up to the assemblage with awe, as to the House of Lords.
Could his fellow-peers of the House of Lords have seen him then they would have held up their noble hands in holy horror.
What would his fellow peers in the House of Lords have said had one pointed to this dancing giant, with his barbaric headdress and his metal ornaments, and said: "There, my lords, is John Clayton, Lord Greystoke.
Why, you'd have to go to Doctors' Commons with a suit, and you'd have to go to a court of Common Law with a suit, and you'd have to go to the House of Lords with a suit, and you'd have to get an Act of Parliament to enable you to marry again, and it would cost you
This was because I nearly always assumed a character when I wrote; I must be a country squire, or an undergraduate, or a butler, or a member of the House of Lords, or a dowager, or a lady called Sweet Seventeen, or an engineer in India, else was my pen clogged, and though this gave my mother certain fearful joys, causing her to laugh unexpectedly (so far as my articles were concerned she nearly always laughed in the wrong place), it also scared her.
Above him poised the savage brute that was today bent upon the destruction of a human life--the same creature who a few months before, had occupied his seat in the House of Lords at London, a respected and distinguished member of that august body.
against which in one of his essays he had directly cautioned judges), and threw himself on the mercy of the House of Lords, with whom the sentence lay.