house wren

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house wren

n.
A small brown wren (Troglodytes aedon) found throughout the Americas.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.house wren - common American wren that nests around houseshouse wren - common American wren that nests around houses
jenny wren, wren - any of several small active brown birds of the northern hemisphere with short upright tails; they feed on insects
genus Troglodytes, Troglodytes - type genus of the Troglodytidae
References in periodicals archive ?
Second, we compare the nesting activity of bluebirds with that of other cavity nesting species at the study site including a nest box population of house wrens (Troglodytes aedon).
The records have helped expand knowledge of bluebirds, tree swallows, house wrens and other species that make their homes in trees and nest boxes.
House wrens and blue jays dipped but rebounded by 2005.
His service project, completed for Silver Falls State Park, involved creating birdhouses and nesting boxes for mountain chickadees and house wrens.
The birds I observe frequently include American robins, house sparrows, house finches, tree swallows, American goldfinches, mourning doves, and house wrens.
Finch (1989) investigated the relationship of habitat characteristics on nest box use and reproductive success of cavity nesting house wrens (Troglodytes aedon) in southeastern Wyoming.
No warblers nested, but 19 boxes (28%) were used by House Wrens (Troglodytes aedon; 24 nests) or Carolina Chickadees (Poecile carolinensis; 1 nest).
House Wren: Regular backyard visitors, house wrens have diets that consist almost exclusively of insects and spiders.
In this study, we used path analysis to examine the interactions between House Wrens (Troglodytes aedon) and two species of ectoparasitic mites, Path analysis, a technique based on multiple regression methods, permits assessment not only of direct effects of the mites on nestling health, but also of indirect effects (King 1993, Mitchell 1993, Wootton 1994, Sokal and Rohlf 1995).
House wrens and chickadees use the bird houses set back in the pines.
from bushes and trees, and if house wrens take over the boxes, move them farther away from trees and shrubs.
Every year, tree swallows and house wrens take over almost two-thirds of the 400 bluebird houses in Fort Lewis, Washington.