housefront

housefront

(ˈhaʊsˌfrʌnt)
n
(Architecture) the façade of a house
References in periodicals archive ?
Even the front curtain is of a mock Tudor housefront while designer Christopher Woods's extravagant set has the right wallpaper and, naturally, a trio of flying ducks on the wall.
I went through a compound, came out at the housefront, and found him there, waiting.
The complexity of the natural world, with its multiplicity of leaves and grasses, and its prismatic reflections, offered him a compelling reason to indulge his horror vacui--his apparently unappeasable desire to subdivide and embellish --so that when he translates a view of a housefront overgrown with ivy or an expanse of trees into a green mosaic, the result seems logical and personal, instead of purely willful, as it does in his overwrought figure paintings.
Better are the comparatively subtle symbols of the production design -- rose petals scattered like drops of blood on the stark white porch, a housefront divided into abstract pieces.
DENVER -- HouseFront, a real estate search and valuation firm, today announced the launch of HouseAds (available today at www.
Further, by sending a text to 'HOUSE' with the celebrity's name, HouseFront will reply with the owner's property data (assuming the celebrity name is listed as the homeowner on public records.
HouseFront, A New Service, Provides Home Information to Your Mobile Device Via Text Message; Information on More Than 100 Million Homes Now Available
Landsman describes it for us in some detail: "Half a dozen crooked lanes tumble into it, following paths first laid down by long vanished Ukrainian goats or aurochs, past housefronts that are faithful copies of lost Ukrainian originals" (106).
Here he is writing about a wait for a bus in Aksaray: "So decayed were these housefronts on the lane that they looked more like mud cliffs than buildings, their windows such holes as martins might nest in, and the waiting-room like a cave quarried out of crumbling stone.
Some housefronts were smashed, smoke was rising from several areas and gunfire rang out constantly across the city.
Illustrating the regal and emulous splendor with which such men displayed their riches, he quotes The History of Italy (1549), by William Thomas, who found the housefronts on the Grand Canal "more like the doings of princes than private men.
Gaudy flashing lights, dodgy Slade singles, and plastic Santas glued to housefronts - all have become festive fixtures along with the more old-fashioned mistletoe and mulled wine.