hull


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Hull

 (hŭl) also King·ston-up·on-Hull (kĭng′stən-ə-pŏn-hŭl′, -pôn-)
A city of northeast-central England on the northern shore of the Humber estuary at the influx of the Hull River. Chartered in 1299, the city has been a major seaport since the late 1700s.

hull

 (hŭl)
n.
1.
a. The dry outer covering of a fruit, seed, or nut; a husk.
b. The persistent calyx of a fruit, such as a strawberry, that is usually green and easily detached.
2.
a. Nautical The frame or body of a ship, exclusive of masts, engines, or superstructure.
b. The main body of various other large vehicles, such as a tank, airship, or flying boat.
3. The outer casing of a rocket, guided missile, or spaceship.
tr.v. hulled, hull·ing, hulls
To remove the hulls of (fruit or seeds).

[Middle English hol, husk, from Old English hulu; see kel- in Indo-European roots.]

hull′er n.

hull

(hʌl)
n
1. (Nautical Terms) the main body of a vessel, tank, flying boat, etc
2. (Botany) the shell or pod of peas or beans; the outer covering of any fruit or seed; husk
3. (Botany) the persistent calyx at the base of a strawberry, raspberry, or similar fruit
4. (Astronautics) the outer casing of a missile, rocket, etc
vb
5. (Cookery) to remove the hulls from (fruit or seeds)
6. (Nautical Terms) (tr) to pierce the hull of (a vessel, tank, etc)
[Old English hulu; related to Old High German helawa, Old English helan to hide]
ˈhuller n
ˈhull-less adj

Hull

(hʌl)
n
1. (Placename) a city and port in NE England, in Kingston upon Hull unitary authority, East Riding of Yorkshire: fishing, food processing; two universities. Pop: 301 416 (2001). Official name: Kingston upon Hull
2. (Placename) a city in SE Canada, in SW Quebec on the River Ottawa: a centre of the timber trade and associated industries. Pop: 66 246 (2001)

Hull

(hʌl)
n
(Biography) Cordell. 1871–1955, US statesman; secretary of state (1933–44). He helped to found the U.N.: Nobel peace prize 1945

hull1

(hʌl)

n.
1. the husk, shell, or outer covering of a seed or fruit.
2. the calyx of certain fruits, as the strawberry.
3. any covering or envelope.
v.t.
4. to remove the hull of; skin, peel, shell, or shuck.
[before 1000; Middle English; Old English hulu husk, pod; akin to Old English helan to cover, hide, Latin cēlāre to hide, conceal, Greek kalýptein to cover up]

hull2

(hʌl)

n.
1. the hollow lowermost portion of a ship, floating partially submerged and supporting the remainder of the ship.
2.
a. the boatlike fuselage of a flying boat on which the plane lands or takes off.
b. the cigar-shaped arrangement of girders enclosing the gasbag of a rigid dirigible.
v.t.
3. to pierce (the hull of a ship), esp. below the water line.
v.i.
4. to drift without power or sails.
[1350–1400; Middle English; appar. same word as hull1]

Hull

(hʌl)

n.
1. Cordell, 1871–1955, U.S. Secretary of State 1933–44: Nobel peace prize 1945.
2. Official name, Kingston upon Hull. a seaport in Humberside, in E England, on the Humber River. 279,700.
3. a city in SE Canada, on the Ottawa River opposite Ottawa. 58,722.

hull

(hŭl)
1. The dry outer covering of a fruit, seed, or nut; a husk.
2. The enlarged calyx of a fruit, such as a strawberry, that is usually green and easily detached.

hull


Past participle: hulled
Gerund: hulling

Imperative
hull
hull
Present
I hull
you hull
he/she/it hulls
we hull
you hull
they hull
Preterite
I hulled
you hulled
he/she/it hulled
we hulled
you hulled
they hulled
Present Continuous
I am hulling
you are hulling
he/she/it is hulling
we are hulling
you are hulling
they are hulling
Present Perfect
I have hulled
you have hulled
he/she/it has hulled
we have hulled
you have hulled
they have hulled
Past Continuous
I was hulling
you were hulling
he/she/it was hulling
we were hulling
you were hulling
they were hulling
Past Perfect
I had hulled
you had hulled
he/she/it had hulled
we had hulled
you had hulled
they had hulled
Future
I will hull
you will hull
he/she/it will hull
we will hull
you will hull
they will hull
Future Perfect
I will have hulled
you will have hulled
he/she/it will have hulled
we will have hulled
you will have hulled
they will have hulled
Future Continuous
I will be hulling
you will be hulling
he/she/it will be hulling
we will be hulling
you will be hulling
they will be hulling
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been hulling
you have been hulling
he/she/it has been hulling
we have been hulling
you have been hulling
they have been hulling
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been hulling
you will have been hulling
he/she/it will have been hulling
we will have been hulling
you will have been hulling
they will have been hulling
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been hulling
you had been hulling
he/she/it had been hulling
we had been hulling
you had been hulling
they had been hulling
Conditional
I would hull
you would hull
he/she/it would hull
we would hull
you would hull
they would hull
Past Conditional
I would have hulled
you would have hulled
he/she/it would have hulled
we would have hulled
you would have hulled
they would have hulled

hull

To remove the leaves and stems from soft fruit.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hull - dry outer covering of a fruit or seed or nuthull - dry outer covering of a fruit or seed or nut
shell - the hard usually fibrous outer layer of some fruits especially nuts
husk - outer membranous covering of some fruits or seeds
2.hull - persistent enlarged calyx at base of e.g. a strawberry or raspberry
calyx - (botany) the whorl of sepals of a flower collectively forming the outer floral envelope or layer of the perianth enclosing and supporting the developing bud; usually green
3.hull - United States naval officer who commanded the `Constitution' during the War of 1812 and won a series of brilliant victories against the British (1773-1843)Hull - United States naval officer who commanded the `Constitution' during the War of 1812 and won a series of brilliant victories against the British (1773-1843)
4.hull - United States diplomat who did the groundwork for creating the United Nations (1871-1955)Hull - United States diplomat who did the groundwork for creating the United Nations (1871-1955)
5.Hull - a large fishing port in northeastern England
Humber Bridge - a suspension bridge at Hull, England; 4,626 feet long
England - a division of the United Kingdom
6.hull - the frame or body of ship
keel - one of the main longitudinal beams (or plates) of the hull of a vessel; can extend vertically into the water to provide lateral stability
keelson - a longitudinal beam connected to the keel of ship to strengthen it
rib - support resembling the rib of an animal
rider plate - a horizontal beam (or plate) connected to the top of a ship's vertical keel or to the keelson
structure, construction - a thing constructed; a complex entity constructed of many parts; "the structure consisted of a series of arches"; "she wore her hair in an amazing construction of whirls and ribbons"
vessel, watercraft - a craft designed for water transportation
Verb1.hull - remove the hulls from; "hull the berries"
remove, take away, withdraw, take - remove something concrete, as by lifting, pushing, or taking off, or remove something abstract; "remove a threat"; "remove a wrapper"; "Remove the dirty dishes from the table"; "take the gun from your pocket"; "This machine withdraws heat from the environment"

hull

noun
1. framework, casing, body, covering, frame, skeleton The hull had suffered extensive damage to the starboard side.
2. husk, skin, shell, peel, pod, rind, shuck I soaked the hulls off lima beans.
verb
1. trim, peel, skin, shell, husk, shuck Soak them in water with lemon juice for 30 minutes before hulling.
Translations
جِسْمُ السَّفِينَةُجِسْم السَّفينَه
trup
skrog
laivan runko
trup
hajótest
skipsskrokkur
船体
선체
korpuss
skrov
ตัวเรือ
thân tàu

hull

[hʌl]
A. N (Naut) → casco m
B. VT [+ fruit] → descascarar

hull

[ˈhʌl]
n [ship] → coque f
vt [+ peas] → écosser

hull

1
n (Naut) → Schiffskörper m; (Aviat) → Rumpf m; ship hull down on the horizonSchiff in Sicht am Horizont

hull

2
nHülse f; (of strawberries etc)Blättchen nt
vtschälen; strawberries etcentstielen

hull

[hʌl] n (of ship) → scafo

hull

(hal) noun
the frame or body of a ship. The hull of the ship was painted black.

hull

جِسْمُ السَّفِينَةُ trup skrog Schiffskörper κύτος casco, vaina laivan runko coque trup scafo 船体 선체 romp skrog kadłub casco de barco корпус skrov ตัวเรือ gemi teknesi thân tàu 船体
References in classic literature ?
our venerable friend was knocked down to a certain Captain John Hull.
When they had all sufficiently examined the broken leg, Grandfather told them a story about Captain John Hull and the Pine-tree Shillings.
And I shall still have the iron hull," said the captain in a softer tone.
Nearly twenty thousand pounds had been expended, and Fogg left the hull and engine to the captain, that is, near the whole value of the craft
He makes his berth an Aladdin's lamp, and lays him down in it; so that in the pitchiest night the ship's black hull still houses an illumination.
First she loomed before me like a blot of something yet blacker than darkness, then her spars and hull began to take shape, and the next moment, as it seemed (for, the farther I went, the brisker grew the current of the ebb), I was alongside of her hawser and had laid hold.
All round the hull, in the blackness, the rippling current bubbled and chattered like a little mountain stream.
Had it not been for the superior strength of the hull of the Moravian, she would have been broken by the shock and gone down with the 237 passengers she was bringing home from Canada.
At seventeen minutes past four in the afternoon, whilst the passengers were assembled at lunch in the great saloon, a slight shock was felt on the hull of the Scotia, on her quarter, a little aft of the port-paddle.
dashing his forehead against her hull, he so stove her in, that in less than ten minutes she settled down and fell over.
Don't go a-thinkin' you can lick the hull rebel army at the start, because yeh can't.
I WAS born in the year 1632, in the city of York, of a good family, though not of that country, my father being a foreigner of Bremen, who settled first at Hull.