prehistory

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Related to Human prehistory: prehistoric culture

pre·his·to·ry

 (prē-hĭs′tə-rē)
n. pl. pre·his·to·ries
1. History of humankind in the period before recorded history.
2. The circumstances or developments leading up to or surrounding an event or situation; background: "[He] then told me the curious prehistory of his obsessive interest in the seduction theory" (Janet Malcolm).

pre′his·tor′i·an (-hĭ-stôr′ē-ən, -stŏr′-) n.

prehistory

(priːˈhɪstərɪ)
n, pl -ries
1. (Archaeology) the prehistoric period
2. (Archaeology) the study of this period, relying entirely on archaeological evidence
prehistorian n

pre•his•to•ry

(priˈhɪs tə ri, -ˈhɪs tri)

n., pl. -ries.
1. human history in the period before recorded events, known mainly through archaeological discoveries, study, research, etc.
2. a history of the events or circumstances leading to something.
[1870–75]
pre`his•to′ri•an (-hɪˈstɔr i ən, -ˈstoʊr-) n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.prehistory - the time during the development of human culture before the appearance of the written wordprehistory - the time during the development of human culture before the appearance of the written word
period, period of time, time period - an amount of time; "a time period of 30 years"; "hastened the period of time of his recovery"; "Picasso's blue period"
Bronze Age - (archeology) a period between the Stone and Iron Ages, characterized by the manufacture and use of bronze tools and weapons
Iron Age - (archeology) the period following the Bronze Age; characterized by rapid spread of iron tools and weapons
Stone Age - (archeology) the earliest known period of human culture, characterized by the use of stone implements
glacial epoch, glacial period, ice age - any period of time during which glaciers covered a large part of the earth's surface; "the most recent ice age was during the Pleistocene"
Translations
pravěk
prapovijestpretpovijest

prehistory

[ˈpriːˈhɪstərɪ] Nprehistoria f

prehistory

[ˌpriːˈhɪstəri] npréhistoire fpre-industrial [ˌpriːɪnˈdʌstriəl] preindustrial (US) adjpréindustriel(le)

prehistory

prehistory

[ˌpriːˈhɪstrɪ] npreistoria
References in periodicals archive ?
Wide as the Wind portrays Polynesian voyages across the Pacific Ocean in canoes with no metal parts or instruments: the greatest adventure in human prehistory, as bold as modern space voyages (National Geographic).
But now, research in human prehistory offers the promise of a global human origination story with a retelling that humans may agree as sacred, meaning something that touches deeply and intimately the formation of our present human nature.
These areas provide major contrasts in human prehistory and biomes.
She successfully combines stories about different generations of the Woolly clan with a timeline which explains this long period of human prehistory.
But for all its woes, the town may have found its ticket in another form of fossil fuel: human prehistory, linked to discoveries of ancient bones in the area.
2013): The Past in Perspective: An Introduction to Human Prehistory (6a ed.
DeFries describes a pattern in human prehistory and history in which people find a way to produce more food, increase the population beyond the environment's capacity, then turn in another direction to repeat the pattern.
The study raises the possibility that researchers could combine linguistic data with archaeology and anthropology "to tell the story of human prehistory," for instance by recreating ancient migrations and contacts between people, said William Croft, a comparative linguist at the University of New Mexico, who was not involved in the study.
There is also a lot of good information on human prehistory, which examines things like the ancient Egyptian society and also touches on ancient peoples from several other continents.
The geologist Charles Lyell's interpretation of archeological remains and Charles Darwin's theory of evolution combined to open up a vast swath of human prehistory.
Calling the collection a humanist's natural history of evolutionary essays, Gould (1941-2002), one of the best known American scientists of the 20th century, looks at art and science, biographies in evolution, human prehistory, of history and toleration, evolutionary facts and theories, and different perceptions of common truths.
Young earth creationists will want to pack all of human prehistory into a short time (less than ~4,000 years).

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