humanism

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hu·man·ism

 (hyo͞o′mə-nĭz′əm)
n.
1.
a. A system of thought that focuses on humans and their values, capacities, and worth.
b. Humanism A cultural and intellectual movement of the Renaissance that emphasized human potential to attain excellence and promoted direct study of the literature, art, and civilization of classical Greece and Rome.
c. The study of the humanities; learning in the liberal arts.
d. Secular humanism.
2. Concern with the interests, needs, and welfare of humans: "the newest flower on the vine of corporate humanism" (Savvy).

humanism

(ˈhjuːməˌnɪzəm)
n
1. (Philosophy) the denial of any power or moral value superior to that of humanity; the rejection of religion in favour of a belief in the advancement of humanity by its own efforts
2. (Philosophy) a philosophical position that stresses the autonomy of human reason in contradistinction to the authority of the Church
3. (Literary & Literary Critical Movements) (often capital) a cultural movement of the Renaissance, based on classical studies
4. interest in the welfare of people
ˈhumanist n
ˌhumanˈistic adj
ˌhumanˈistically adv

hu•man•ism

(ˈhyu məˌnɪz əm; often ˈyu-)

n.
1. (often cap.) any system of thought or action in which human interests, values, and dignity predominate, esp. an ethical theory that often rejects the importance of a belief in God.
2. devotion to or study of the humanities.
3. (sometimes cap.) the studies, principles, or culture of the Renaissance humanists.
[1805–15]

humanism

1. any system or mode of thought or action in which human interests, values, and dignity are taken to be of primary importance, as in moral judgments.
2. a devotion to or study of the humanities.
3. a theory of the life of man as a responsible being behaving independently of a revelation or deity. Also called naturalistic, scientific, or philosophical humanism. — humanist, n. — humanistic, adj.
See also: Mankind

humanism

A view originating in the Renaissance that reason must be autonomous from authorities such as the Church.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.humanism - the doctrine that people's duty is to promote human welfare
doctrine, ism, philosophical system, philosophy, school of thought - a belief (or system of beliefs) accepted as authoritative by some group or school
2.humanism - the doctrine emphasizing a person's capacity for self-realization through reason; rejects religion and the supernatural
doctrine, ism, philosophical system, philosophy, school of thought - a belief (or system of beliefs) accepted as authoritative by some group or school
3.humanism - the cultural movement of the Renaissance; based on classical studies
cultural movement - a group of people working together to advance certain cultural goals
Translations
humanismushumanizmus
humanizam
humanisme

humanism

[ˈhjuːmənɪzəm] Nhumanismo m

humanism

[ˈhjuːmənɪzəm] nhumanisme m

humanism

nHumanismus m

humanism

[ˈhjuːməˌnɪzm] numanesimo
References in periodicals archive ?
Lisa Poupart, Associate Professor of Humanistic Studies, University of Wisconsin - Green Bay;
Academic background: BS, psychology and humanistic studies, McGill University; MPH, public health, Brown University; MS, epidemiology, and PhD, nutritional epidemiology, both at Harvard.
Ahmed Galal, managing director of the Economic Research Forum with Marc Fleurbaey, a professor of economics and humanistic studies at Princeton University and Francois Bourguignon, of the Paris School of Economics
The Global Movement of Moderates Foundation (GMMF) has inked a Memorandum of understanding (MoU) with the Institute for Advanced Humanistic Studies (IAHS) at the Peking University in China.
A guide to humanistic studies in aging; what does it mean to grow old?
Aldrete (Professor of History and Humanistic Studies, University of Wisconsin at Green Bay) presents Daily Life in the Roman City: Rome Pompeii, and Ostia, a scholarly examination of the similarities and differences of ancient Rome's cities-their infrastructure, government, economy, dangers, highlights, entertainment, religion, and more.
While we know quite a lot about ancient armour made from metal, linothorax remains something of a mystery since no examples have survived, due to the perishable nature of the material," the Discovery News quoted Gregory Aldrete, professor of history and humanistic studies at the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay, as saying.
Like Kornai, Mikhalevski came to economics late and accidentally after a broader exposure to humanistic studies, taught himself to be a mathematical economist, developed multi-level models, predicted the ultimate non-viability of the system, was hounded by the secret police, but was protected in his heresies by an institution.
In this milieu, the figure of the intellectually accomplished and morally unimpeachable woman, behind whom stood the influential court lady, came to symbolize in men's minds the current ascending cultural trend: in earlier times, the age of humanistic studies and, in later decades, that of vernacular literature.
He embodied in his connection to his profession and political causes the same sort of reflexive critique that he claimed was the core of humanistic studies.
The Institute for Humanistic Studies was founded in 1999 as a think tank and resource for humanists and it provides grant money to

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