Hume


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Hume

 (hyo͞om), David 1711-1776.
British philosopher and historian whose skeptical arguments concerning induction, causation and religion, including the thesis that human knowledge arises only from sense experience, shaped 19th- and 20th-century empiricist philosophy. His works include A Treatise of Human Nature (1739-1740) and History of England (1754-1762).

Hume

, John born 1937.
Politician of Northern Ireland. Head of the Social Democratic and Labour Party since 1979, Hume shared the 1998 Nobel Peace Prize with David Trimble for working to establish peace in Northern Ireland.

Hume

(hjuːm)
n
1. (Biography) (George) Basil. 1923–99, English Roman Catholic Benedictine monk and cardinal; archbishop of Westminster (1976–99)
2. (Biography) David. 1711–76, Scottish empiricist philosopher, economist, and historian, whose sceptic philosophy restricted human knowledge to that which can be perceived by the senses. His works include A Treatise of Human Nature (1740), An Enquiry concerning the Principles of Morals (1751), Political Discourses (1752), and History of England (1754–62)
3. (Biography) John. born 1937, Northern Ireland politician; leader of the Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP) (1979–2001). Nobel peace prize jointly with David Trimble in 1998
ˈHumism n

Hume

(hyum; often yum)

n.
David, 1711–76, Scottish philosopher and historian.
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Noun1.Hume - Scottish philosopher whose sceptical philosophy restricted human knowledge to that which can be perceived by the senses (1711-1776)Hume - Scottish philosopher whose sceptical philosophy restricted human knowledge to that which can be perceived by the senses (1711-1776)
References in classic literature ?
From the time of Descartes to Hume and Kant it has had little or nothing to do with facts of science.
But crude and unmeaning as this philosophy is, it exercised a great influence on his successors, not unlike that which Locke exercised upon Berkeley and Berkeley upon Hume himself.
The way was partly prepared for Gibbon by two Scottish historians, his early contemporaries, the philosopher David Hume and the clergyman William Robertson, but they have little of his scientific conscientiousness.
The Bacon, the Spinoza, the Hume, Schelling, Kant, or whosoever propounds to you a philosophy of the mind, is only a more or less awkward translator of things in your consciousness which you have also your way of seeing, perhaps of denominating.
From memory it is an easy step to what are called "ideas"--not in the Platonic sense, but in that of Locke, Berkeley and Hume, in which they are opposed to "impressions.
Hence, Hume believes that moral sentiments are authoritative only when possessed of the standard of taste.
The Food Standards Agency (FSA) said it had stopped any product from leaving Russell Hume sites after the firm "failed to demonstrate compliance" with hygiene regulations.
Summary: New Delhi [India], Jan 11 (ANI): Forward Iain Hume struck a hat-trick to guide Kerala Blasters FC to a thrilling 3-1 victory over Delhi Dynamos in their Indian Super League (ISL) clash at the Jawaharlal Nehru Stadium here in the national capital last evening.
JOHN HUME famously never kept a diary, at least not the kind that would contain personal reflections that have so often proven indispensible to the portrayal of a complex and storied life.
Hume devotes Part I of "Of Miracles" to arguing for the first lemma and making the lemma intelligible by showing that testimony is commensurable with experience that supports a candidate for a law of nature.
As with so many philosophers, what was of greatest interest in the life of Hume is to be found in his head and in the pages of his books.