hylomorphism

(redirected from Hylemorphism)
Related to Hylemorphism: Hylomorphism

hylomorphism

(ˌhaɪləˈmɔːfɪzəm)
n
(Philosophy) the philosophical doctrine that identifies matter with the first cause of the universe

hylomorphism

the theory derived from Aristotle that every physical object is composed of two principles, an unchanging prime matter and a form deprived of actuality with every substantial change of the object. — hylomorphist, n.hylomorphic, adj.
See also: Philosophy
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References in periodicals archive ?
The chapter articulates a particularly incisive treatment of hylemorphism and atomism, and it includes a discussion of antireductionism in contemporary analytic philosophy.
Hylemorphism is required if we are to explain the reality of change.
The difference between the two views of nature lies in this: According to Aristotelian hylemorphism, natural substances are in the last analysis understood as composites of prime matter and of substantial forms, where the latter inhere in the former only transitorily.
On Hylemorphism and Personal Identity, PATRICK TONER
In the wake of Platonic and Aristotelian hylemorphism, Plotinus defines the One by its activity which is "everywhere and nowhere ([TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII])" (82) precisely because it is nothing but activity, pure life.
If we wanted to translate Monod's scientific language into the philosophical language of hylemorphism, we would have to say that the formal cause in Monod is invariance, that is, the DNA that controls the invariance of the species.
Though believing to be faithful to tradition, he ended up building, quite unwittingly, a bridge from hylemorphism to atomism.
This volume demonstrates (against a common misrepresentation) that (1) hylemorphic composition is not to be understood as a juxtaposition of preexisting and unrelated principles (matter and form) but that (2) hylemorphism can account for the unity of natural substances, and (3) reconcile this unity with the reality of the autonomous movement of nature toward its end.