hyperrational


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hyperrational

(ˌhaɪpəˈræʃənəl)
adj
characterized by excessive rationality
References in classic literature ?
You feel your way with the speed of light, by some hyperrational process, to truth.
Economic analysis relies neither on any notion of hyperrational actors myopically concerned with maximizing monetary rewards, nor on postulating perfectly competitive markets.
It will take multilevel and multidisciplinary consciousness-raising to release our hyperrational, increasingly global society from these ancient and terrible evolutionary traps.
3) His hyperrational black canvases, five feet square, with subtle gradations of pigment, served as a testament to what art could be.
From that truth, she begins her path toward bedlam by laving blame on economics for constructing itself around the hyperrational, self-interested, and very masculine, "economic man," which she thinks has blinded the discipline to women's concerns and other forms of behavior more associated with women.
Young Amos's life revolves around his beautiful dreamer of a mother (played by Natalie Portman, who also wrote and directed) and his hyperrational father (Gilad Kahana).
The term hyperrational denotes that agents have (1) unbiased beliefs and (2) the cognitive capacity to derive their optimal behavior contingent on these beliefs.
Practice theorists set themselves against a hyperrational and intellectualized picture of human agency and the social.
This challenging method of thinking symbolically is a practice of Jungian psychology that the authors contend has become lost in our hyperrational society, and they show how working with the Medusa myth offers a guide through personal transformation.
If this sort of criticism has its limitations--it is necessarily inexact, deeply subjective, and as much about the critic as the poet--then it likewise lays bare the shortcomings of its Amoldian counterpart, which appears desiccated and hyperrational by comparison.
Selten 1990), Williamson (2010, 219) concludes that stakeholders "are neither hyperrational nor irrational but are attempting effectively to cope with complex contracts that are incomplete.
As they did so, the fundamental focus of study shifted from understanding how imperfect people coordinate their actions with others to an exercise in modeling representative automatons as hyperrational, maximizing agents.