I've


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I've

 (īv)
Contraction of I have.

I've

(aɪv)
contraction of
(Grammar) I have

I've

(aɪv)
contraction of I have.

-ive

a suffix of adjectives (and nouns of adjectival origin) expressing tendency, disposition, function, connection, etc.: active; corrective; detective; sportive.
[< Latin -īvus; in some words, representing French -ive, feminine of -if]
Translations

have

(hӕv) 3rd person singular present tense has (hӕz) : past tense, past participle had (hӕd) : short forms I've (ӕiv) (I have), you've (juːv) (you have), he's (hiːz) (he has), she's (ʃiːz) (she has), it's (its) (it has), we've (wiːv) (we have), they've (ðeiv) (they have), I'd (aid) (I had), you'd (juːd) (you had), he'd (hiːd) (he had), she'd (ʃiːd) (she had), it'd (ˈitəd) (it had), we'd (wiːd) (we had), they'd (ðeid) (they had): negative short forms hadn't (ˈhӕdnt) (had not), hasn't (ˈhӕznt) (has not), haven't (ˈhӕvnt) (have not) – verb
1. used with past participle of other verbs to show that an action is in the indefinite past and has been completed. I've bought a new dictionary; Has he gone yet?.
2. (also have got) to hold or possess (something which belongs to oneself or to someone else). I have a book of yours at home; He's got your book; I don't have any books by Sir Walter Scott.
3. (also have got) to possess something as part of oneself or in some way connected with oneself. She has blue eyes; Our house has six rooms; I've got a pain in my stomach.
4. (sometimes with back) to receive or get. Have you had any news of your brother?; Thank you for lending me the book – you can have it back next week.
5. to produce. He does have some good ideas; She has had a baby.
6. to cause to be done. I'm having a tooth (taken) out; Have Smith come and see me.
7. to enjoy or suffer. We had a lovely holiday.
8. to do or take. I'll have a drink; Let me have a try.
9. to allow. I will not have you wearing clothes like that!
10. (with back, ~in, ~round etc) to ask to one's house as a guest or to do a job. We're having friends round for dinner; We're having someone in to paint this room.
11. to think or feel. I have some doubts about this project.
12. to trick. You've been had!
ˈhas-been noun
a person who is no longer famous and important.
have done with
to stop or put an end to. Let's have done with all this quarrelling.
have had it
to be dead, ruined etc. The bullet went into his brain – he's had it, I'm afraid.
have it in oneself etc
to have the courage or ability to do something. I hear she told her boss to stop shouting at her – I didn't think she had it in her.
have it out (often with with)
to argue with (a person) in order to put an end to some disagreement. I'm going to have it out with her once and for all.
have on
1. (also have got on) to wear. That's a nice suit you have on.
2. to fool (someone). You're having me on – that's not really true, is it?
3. (also have got on) to be busy with. Have you (got) anything on this afternoon?
have to (also have got to)
to be obliged to (do something). I don't want to do this, but I have to; Do you have to go so soon?; I've got to leave soon; You didn't have to do that, did you?
have to do with (a person or thing) , (also have got to do with)
to be of importance or concern to (a person or thing). What have these letters to do with you?; Your remarks have (got) nothing to do with the subject we are discussing.
have up (usually with for)
to make (a person) appear in court to answer some charge. He was had up for drunken driving.
have what it takes , (also have got what it takes)
to have the qualities or ability that one needs to do something. He has (got) what it takes to make a good officer.
I have it! , (also I've got it!)
I have found the answer (to a problem etc).
References in classic literature ?
I've wanted it so long," said Jo, who was a bookworm.
I suppose it won't be for a year or two but I've been thinking about it," he said, rising and going toward the door.
This summer I'm going to build the house for mother I've talked about so long.
I've said it already--she was literally, she was hideously, hard; she had turned common and almost ugly.
I know more about business than he does; I am a better manager than he is; I can read better than he can; I can write a better hand,--and I've learned it all myself, and no thanks to him,--I've learned it in spite of him; and now what right has he to make a dray-horse of me?
I know the region where the Seventh's child's aunt lives; I know all the lovely country for miles around; I'll bet I've seen her aunt's villa many a time; I'll bet I've been in it in those pleasant old times when I was a Spanish gentleman.
I've hunted high and I've hunted low, and it does beat all what HAS become of your other shirt.
Eppie, there's a thing I've had on my mind to do this two year, and now the money's been brought back to us, we can do it.
I've been much drawn out in prayer for her of late, and I look on it as a token that there may be mercy in store for her.
Tis best to fix the very day: So, by a learned friend's advice, I've made it Noon, the Fourth of May.
The safety of the Hive is the highest thing I've ever heard of.
Do you think I should be such a fool as to do what I've done for a woman?