long meter

(redirected from Iambic tetrameter)
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Related to Iambic tetrameter: Iambic pentameter, Iambic meter, Iambic trimeter

long meter

n.
A quatrain in iambic tetrameter, rhyming in the second and fourth lines and often in the first and third. Also called long measure.
References in periodicals archive ?
Less than 40 percent of all lines, however, realize the abstract metrical template of iambic tetrameter faithfully in having four stresses, and deviations from the metrical template are unevenly distributed across the lines within the stanza.
You might think the persnickety rules of writing a Shakespearean sonnet, say, or a rondeau in iambic tetrameter, would be stifling.
From the perspective of a hard modernist (like Imagist Pound) or hard postcolonial localist (like Brathwaite in the 1970s), McKay's use of tetrameter couplets in "The Apple-Woman's Complaint" can appear particularly constrained; one of the most popular poetic forms in English (a number of ballads by Burns and Kipling are in the form), their jingling regularities have made iambic tetrameter couplets particularly common in doggerel, and McKay's poem largely toes that metric line, deviating from perfect rhymed couplets of iambic tetrameter only occasionally.
We can, of course, dispense with some of the rhyme and we can strive for a greater accuracy in the translation, but the iambic tetrameter is what I cherish.
Composed of 131 stanzas (four-line ABBA iambic tetrameter stanzas, called by critics In Memoriam Stanzas) and organized around three Christmas seasons, In Memoriam reflects the poets both painful and at other times optimistic thoughts over the death of his friend.
When, toward the end of the play, it laments the power of Cyprus (Aphrodite) over the fate of both Hippolytus and Phaedra, their iambic tetrameter verse stumbles back into a triple cadence (or an inverted third foot): "but these are all thy slaves, / And subject, O Cyprus, to thee" (Hippolytus, p.
I want an iambic tetrameter at least four stanzas long from this experience.
While employing the iambic tetrameter couplet, Paterson avoids the great trap of the form, which is the slick click of trite, chiming language--certain, polished, dead.
I hear at least the ghost of iambic tetrameter here, with two trochees thrown in at odd places ("changing" and "frayed by").
Elsewhere, the poet's frustration with 'the cat that parked its situpon/then sat and shat a pat upon/My daffodils and flattened them' is expressed in four stanzas of couplets, internal rhymes and iambic tetrameter which had this reviewer laughing aloud.
Fishman's use of iambic tetrameter in the first stanza calls out to the classical while the gap syntax in the second stanza anchors her in the contemporary.
Although less than half of the twenty-four lines conform exactly, the iambic tetrameter pattern is palpable and there's also a lot of internal rhyme, assonance, and consonance that contributes to distinguishing the lines as lines.