iatrogenic

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Related to Iatrogenesis: iatrogenic, iatrogenic illness

i·at·ro·gen·ic

 (ī-ăt′rə-jĕn′ĭk)
adj.
Induced unintentionally in a patient by a physician. Used especially of an infection or other complication of treatment.

[Greek iātros, physician; see -iatric + -genic.]

i·at′ro·gen′i·cal·ly adv.

iatrogenic

(aɪˌætrəʊˈdʒɛnɪk)
adj
1. (Medicine) med (of an illness or symptoms) induced in a patient as the result of a physician's words or actions, esp as a consequence of taking a drug prescribed by the physician
2. (Social Welfare) social welfare (of a problem) induced by the means of treating a problem but ascribed to the continuing natural development of the problem being treated
iatrogenicity n

i•at•ro•gen•ic

(aɪˌæ trəˈdʒɛn ɪk, iˌæ-)

adj.
induced unintentionally by the medical treatment of a physician: iatrogenic symptoms.
[1920–25; < Greek iātró(s) healer + -genic]
i•at`ro•gen′e•sis (-ə sɪs) n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.iatrogenic - induced by a physician's words or therapy (used especially of a complication resulting from treatment)
medical specialty, medicine - the branches of medical science that deal with nonsurgical techniques
induced - brought about or caused; not spontaneous; "a case of steroid-induced weakness"
Translations

iatrogenic

adjiatrogen

i·at·ro·gen·ic

a. yatrógeno-a, iatrogénico-a, rel. a un trastorno o lesión producido por un tratamiento o por una instrucción errónea del facultativo;
___ pneumothoraxneumotórax ___;
___ transmissiontransmisión ___.
References in periodicals archive ?
Iatrogenesis may be a major cause of disease burden, but this does not mean that the entirety of medicine is not without merit.
About half of men who undergo prostate-removal surgery experience sexual dysfunction; a third have urination problems; and between one and two in a thousand die as a result of iatrogenesis from the surgery and aftercare.
Other contributors to the spread of BBVs include prostitution and rape in war; BBV-positive persons provide a link in the chain of infection that may lead to iatrogenesis.
As a person who has long advocated holism as the only possible alternative to the unending miseries of allopathy and iatrogenesis, as an individual who has studied Eastern thought since discovering Emerson's "Brahma":
Content areas for the pre-licensure nursing programs that foster understanding of the vulnerability during life transitions include: a) health care decision-making (culture, religion/spirituality, lived experiences, patient and family wishes and expectations, advanced directives), b) palliative care (hospice, end-of-life), c) iatrogenesis, d) advocacy, e) environments of care (acute, community, long-term care, assisted living), f) interdisciplinary collaboration, and g) ageism.
This negates the very reasons they exist - to promote, protect and improve people's health - and is perhaps the supreme example of cultural iatrogenesis.
Schimmel (2003) noted that approximately 20% of patients admitted to a university hospital suffered some sort of iatrogenesis (1), a fifth of which had resulted in serious complications.
Rising rates of surgical intervention in childbirth (Kildea, Pollock and Barclay, 2008; Smith, Plaat and Fisk, 2008; Newman and Hancock, 2009b) provides evidence to suggest the effects of both clinician and professionally initiated iatrogenesis and social and cultural iatrogenesis in childbirth in Australia has burgeoned over the past thirty years (Hamer, 2007; De Costa, 2008; Newman, 2008c; Reiger, 2011).
The first principle of healing is to avoid iatrogenesis.