iconize

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iconize

(ˈaɪkəˌnaɪz) or

iconise

vb
to portray (someone) as an icon
References in periodicals archive ?
Over the long course of the book, Ulitskaya resists the traditional privileging of male activists over female helpers, dissident tourists over iconized peasants.
Popularized during the rule of Louis XIV and famously iconized by Coco Chanel, the enduring allure of French perfumes is acclaimed around the world.
The show's title conveys both the link and contrast between hi-tech and low-tech (iNima being a wordplay which brings together its literal meaning from Ilocano of by hand or handcrafted and the modern idea or invention of communication iconized by the iPad and iPhone).
Yet, after all is said and done, USMC veterans of the World-War-II-era and Korean War have enshrined, idolized, and iconized this rather mediocre machine rifle at a level comparable to a shrine of the Holy Virgin Mary.
Though the subject of a sound experience of a political oppression (after all, used also in the popular culture in the form of already iconized megaphones) deserves a more scrupulous insight, which cannot be provided by the short form of this article.
6) suggests that mother tongues are iconized in that they are "needed to counter the Western values that come along with learning English".
The excessive force by the police has been iconized by a now-famous photograph showing a woman in a red dress being sprayed tear gas by a policeman right into her face, while merely standing in the park.
The image of Mother Iceland became iconized in 1864, when Nordic studies professor Eirfkur Magnusson created the concept of "Iceland as a Mountain Woman" and hired German artist J.
She used a Lacanian interpretation of the visual objectification of women to argue that, if the female image is iconized, then this threatens the male (castration anxiety), and that classic Hollywood cinema has developed various devices and structures to give the male hero (and, by proxy, the male spectator), control over this enchanting and threatening image.
Moreover, it is in Bridget's iconized examples of the antithetical, stereotypical images of the woman as virgin and whore that the mystery of narration's unresolved status and on-going haunting lies in the form of the foreign body 'IT', which has been bequeathed to the narrator, even before his actual meeting and infatuation with Lucy, along with the beautiful foreign picture of the Virgin' (55), presented to Bridget as a consolation gift by her master, Squire Starkey, to alleviate her sorrow for her departed daughter.
Muller: "excessive emotion is iconized by an excessive repetition of a word" (312).