Semmelweis

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Sem·mel·weis

 (zĕm′əl-vīs′), Ignaz Philipp Originally Ignác Fülöp Semmelweis. 1818-1865.
Hungarian physician who determined that puerperal fever in a maternity clinic in Vienna was spread by doctors and students who examined pregnant women directly after performing autopsies. The mortality rate dropped after he required staff members to disinfect their hands before examinations.

Semmelweis

(ˈsɛməlˌvaɪs)
n
(Biography) Ignaz Philipp. 1818–65, Hungarian obstetrician, who discovered the cause of puerperal infection and pioneered the use of antiseptics
References in periodicals archive ?
The quality-improvement work of Ignaz Semmelweis should be required reading for all physicians.
Ignaz Semmelweis of Budapest and the prevention of puerperal fever.
From there, I will go on to recommend to those graduating from colleges everywhere in the world this spring that their hero be Ignaz Semmelweis.
Ignaz Semmelweis, a Hungarian physician, discovers that hand-washing prevents a common but fatal bacterial infection contracted by women during childbirth.
2) In a paper published in 1825, a pharmacist declared that physicians and others attending patients with contagious diseases would benefit from moistening their hands with liquid chloride solution; however, as a result of the seminal studies by Ignaz Semmelweis and Holmes, hand washing gradually became accepted as one of the most important measures for preventing transmission of pathogens in health-care facilities.
Will Sawyer and his right hand Henry the Hand Champion Handwasher went down to Charleston, South Carolina to announce the greatest public health innovation since Ignaz Semmelweis and handwashing in the 1860's.
For example, when the mid-19th century Hungarian physician Ignaz Semmelweis showed that proper hand disinfection correlated with a dramatic decrease in the occurrence of puerperal fever, his suggestion was dismissed because he had no proof of his causal explanation.
Ignaz Semmelweis was a Hungarian obstetrician practicing in the mid-1800's, years before Louis Pasteur came up with his germ theory and Joseph Lister popularized hand washing.
To us, the reticence is just a little too reminiscent of those that balked at the insistence by Ignaz Semmelweis that physicians practice hand-washing in obstetrical wards to limit puerperal fever over a century and a half ago.
The offensive of Ignaz Semmelweis against ineluctable miasms and the therapeutic nihilism
Other scientists discussed in the book include Alfred Wegener and his theory of continental drift, Ignaz Semmelweis and the idea that hand washing would stop the spread of germs, Charles Darwin's theories on the origin of the species, George Cayley's fantastical flying machines, Nikola Tesla's obsession with electricity and Charles Babbage's early computer designs.
It is a curious collage of ideas and techniques drawn from odd thinkers like industrialist Ray Dalio, a physician named Ignaz Semmelweis who pioneered antiseptic procedures, George Orwell, and social psychologists such as Carol Dweck and Carol Tavris.