unlawful combatant

(redirected from Illegal combatants)
Related to Illegal combatants: Lawful combatant, Enemy combatants

unlawful combatant

n.
A civilian who engages in combat without meeting the criteria for a belligerent established by the third Geneva Convention, and who is thus not classified as a prisoner of war when captured.
References in periodicals archive ?
America coined the term of illegal combatants for the terrorists, who were captured during the Operation Enduring Freedom in order to curb their rights as Prisoners of War under Geneva Convention.
Hassan Safadi has been refusing food since the 2nd of March, Omar Abu Shalal, 54, since the 4th of March, Mahmoud Sarsak, the only Gazan to have been incarcerated under Israel's Illegal Combatants Law, since the 24th of March, Mohammed al-Taj, 40, also since the 24th of March and Ja'afar Ezzadeen, 41, since the 27th of march.
Insurgents, not being controlled by states party to international law, are illegal combatants and do not fit well within either category.
No doubt those Afghan and Iraqis who see themselves as freedom fighters battling an occupation force would beg to differ on their status as legal or illegal combatants.
But if you have Gaza or Southern Lebanese guerrilla forces who don't wear uniforms, who are illegal combatants, when is it a legitimate target?
He decreed that all detainees -- legal or illegal combatants -- are protected by Geneva Conventions.
As illegal combatants PMFs, if captured, could be tried as
Those who are truly illegal combatants would be sent to military or civilian jails in the United States, to be tried under time-tested American rules of justice, or sent to an international tribunal.
16) On 28 January 2002, President Bush stated that he had met with his national security team and decided the detainees were illegal combatants and would "not be treated as prisoners of war.
In the second essay, written in 1982, Blumenson succinctly elucidates the Westphalian system of legal and illegal combatants.
By contrast, the memorandum written by the current Justice Department's lawyers from January 2002 on the treatment of prisoners in the 'war on terror' point towards the justification of the President's absolute sovereign authority to designate and treat individuals whom he 'determines from time to time' to be illegal combatants beyond the reach of 'principles and law and the rules of evidence generally recognised in the trial of criminal cases in the United States district courts'.
While protecting the paramilitaries from extradition, the Uribe administration is pushing "alternative sentencing" legislation that would rule out long prison terms in Colombia for illegal combatants who disarm, even for those who have committed crimes against humanity.