Nagy

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Nagy

(Hungarian nɔdj)
n
(Biography) Imre (ˈimrɛ). 1896–1958, Hungarian statesman; prime minister (1953–55; 1956). He was removed from office and later executed when Soviet forces suppressed the revolution of 1956; reburied with honours in 1989
References in periodicals archive ?
61 YEARS AGO (1956) Russian troops entered Hungary to suppress a national uprising led by PM Imre Nagy who promised citizens independence and political freedom.
A few paces south one finds a statue of Imre Nagy, the executed hero of Hungary's 1956 anti-Soviet revolt, standing on a bridge looking forlornly on parliament.
PEil Maleter and Imre Nagy, who were the symbols of this revolution, were both executed in 1958.
1956: The Hungarian Prime Minister, Imre Nagy, appeals for calm as demonstrators battle with Soviet troops.
Thanks to the courage of millions of unnamed and largely forgotten martyrs who fought to end Marxism-Leninism -- the true heroes of the Soviet Union -- and largely forgotten dissident leaders like Imre Nagy in Hungary and Alexander Dubcek in Czechoslovakia, followed by Lech Walesa in Poland, aided and abetted by the Polish Pope John Paul II, with Ronald Reagan and Margaret Thatcher cheering from the bleachers, communism in Russia imploded, bringing down with it the Soviet puppet regimes in Eastern Europe.
Of which eastern European country was Imre Nagy twice prime minister between 1953 and 1956?
Coseley fighter Ryan Corrigan's debut was comfortable and stylish with a 40-37 points success against Hungarian Imre Nagy.
In Hungary, Imre Nagy, who would play a tragic role in 1956, replaced Rakosi, closed Recsk, freed political prisoners, and set the country on a "new course.
Imre Nagy, Martyr of the Nation: Contested History, Legitimacy, and Popular Memory in Hungary, by Karl P.
1989: Hungary reburies fallen hero Imre Nagy Former Communist prime minister Imre Nagy, the man who symbolises the 1956 Hungarian uprising, has been given a formal public funeral 31 years after he was executed.
In a lecture at the opening of this exhibition, Kicsiny discussed the prominence of reburial practices in Hungary, citing, in particular, the very public 1989 reburial of the anti-Soviet leader Imre Nagy, who had been executed on Khrushchev's orders after the failed Hungarian Revolution of 1956.
Imre Nagy replaced Rakosi as prime minister in 1953 and repudiated much of Rakosi's economic program of forced collectivization and heavy industry.