inclined plane

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inclined plane
Pushing a load up a gentle slope requires less effort than lifting it.

inclined plane

n.
A plane set at an angle to the horizontal, especially a simple machine used to raise or lower a load by rolling or sliding.

inclined plane

n
a plane whose angle to the horizontal is less than a right angle

inclined′ plane′


n.
one of the simple machines, a plane surface inclined to the horizon, or forming with a horizontal plane any angle but a right angle.
[1700–10]

in·clined plane

(ĭn′klīnd′)
A plane surface, such as a ramp, set at an acute angle to a horizontal surface. It is a simple machine because it requires less force to slide or roll a body up the plane than to raise the body vertically. Many tools are based on the principle of the inclined plane, such as the ax, screw, wedge, and chisel.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.inclined plane - a simple machine for elevating objectsinclined plane - a simple machine for elevating objects; consists of plane surface that makes an acute angle with the horizontal
simple machine, machine - a device for overcoming resistance at one point by applying force at some other point
ramp, incline - an inclined surface connecting two levels
screw - a simple machine of the inclined-plane type consisting of a spirally threaded cylindrical rod that engages with a similarly threaded hole
wedge - something solid that is usable as an inclined plane (shaped like a V) that can be pushed between two things to separate them
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
Blists Hill was designated as a safe haven for the buildings around Shropshire and the West Midlands that were threatened with demolition and by the time it opened its doors to the public in 1973, it was an open air museum featuring a number of original industrial features such as the Shropshire Canal, the Hay Incline Plane, the brick and tile works and original blast furnaces along with many buildings that had been relocated from the local area.
Furthe, you do not need to dig a hole with a posthole digger but instead dig a slanting hole, an incline plane as though you were going to launch moon rockets.
In this method, droplets of molten lead actually fall only about an inch into a tank of hot water, roll across an incline plane and then continue falling through hot water for another 3 feet or so.