incompossible

incompossible

(ˌɪnkɒmˈpɒsɪbəl)
adj
(Logic) incompatible; mutually exclusive
References in classic literature ?
things are incompossible when the world of being has scope enough for
The incompossible is a situation in which "the past may be true without being necessarily true" and in which mutually exclusive presents generated by this past might exist side by side.
More importantly it invites questions about what is incompossible by virtue of such causal interaction.
Griffin argues that incompossibility is necessary and extrinsically grounded in the essential attributes of God since God cannot actualize incompossible substances.
In particular, one can use the dot-notation introduced in section 6 to express a version of the claim that incompossible objects form a set:
The result is that we find ourselves holding beliefs which are individually plausible but mutually incompossible.
The mixing together of things that are incompossible cannot be stopped.
Deleuze's conceptualization reflects Leibniz's idea that "bifurcations and divergences of series are genuine borders between incompossible worlds, such that the monads that exist wholly include the compossible world that moves into existence" (1993, 81).
In An insufficiency in our screens: our hurt sang back to mlk when the incompossible appeared (2006), architectural fragments mass toward a vertical fold in the center of the drawing: windows, stairs, rooms, and passageways are stitched and creased together by similitude and shading.
Incompossible, maybe, accordant with Gilles Deleuze's logic of sense; streams of the polis resonate through diversions and divergences spurred by the concrete impediments she describes:
These variants are unaware of each other, since the different paths taken by Donnie make them, in Leibniz's terms, incompossible.