indentured servant

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inden′tured serv′ant


n.
a person who is bound to work for another for a specified period of time, esp. such a person who came to America during the colonial period.
[1665–75]
References in periodicals archive ?
There are a few remnants of native stories on the Caribbean islands that speak of sunny times and easy living, says Elswit, but most are from after the arrival of white European colonizers, slaves from West Africa, indentured servants from India, and businessmen and slave-owning plantation owners from the US.
Seventeenth-century reports of the suffering of European indentured servants and the fact that many were transported to Barbados against their wishes has led to a growing body of transatlantic popular literature, particularly dealing with the Irish.
Many were sent as indentured servants, to work for a contracted length of time in order to earn their release.
The focus of the essays reaches beyond the often-studied elite to encompass Native Americans as well as slaves and indentured servants.
The Indians are descendants of Indian indentured servants who came to Guyana from 1838.
Eventually Suzy lived in a two story stone house near Wrights' ferry, built through combined efforts of indentured servants and other colonials.
And Saudi officials, exploiting 'guest workers' who currently heavily outnumber citizens and may soon see those indentured servants begin to claim rights.
Indentured servants from England and Wales would no longer do.
The tobacco fields, farms, and homes of Maryland were cultivated and tended to by slaves, indentured servants, and transported convicts.
Some songs speak about the ruthless treatment migrants suffered as indentured servants, while others disclose the deception of arkdtis (1) and identify hunger as being the chief motivation for leaving India.
com)-- Not your everyday Civil War story, "Shamrocks and Skallywags" encompasses three generations of an Irish family that end up being indentured servants on a plantation in southern Georgia.
Suranyi focuses on how female indentured servants attempted to negotiate some aspects of their servitude.