Indianism


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In·di·an·ism

 (ĭn′dē-ə-nĭz′əm)
n.
1. A word or phrase characteristic of English as spoken in India.
2. Devotion to or preference for the people and culture of India.
3. Devotion to traditional Native American culture or cultures.

In′di·an·ist n.

Indianism

the customs or traditions of Indians, especially American Indians. — Indianist, n.
See also: Behavior
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References in periodicals archive ?
Third are the successful efforts of the leaders of UML to galvanise the Nepali speaking rural masses by anti-India nationalism while the democratic groups led by Nepali Congress have failed to convince the masses that anti Indianism is not nationalism.
They definitely wanted the alap [opening section of a North Indian song] because they wanted that Indianism, and I got to express my Indian classical side also," said the singer.
On the other hand, charismatic leaders like peasant union leader Felipe Quispe sought to mobilize Indianism toward institutionalized party politics, frequently allowing statist terminology such as "taking power" to crowd out more horizontal concepts of "self-governance" (p.
In this context, it is impossible to separate Frisch's photographs from the visual discourse of indianism, even if they seem to be "anthropological" and "objective" at first sight.
In the tyger and the hyena, Burke summons "the two great Evils of our time, Indianism and Jacobinism.
The elements whose very existence depends on anti Indianism will of course try to spike the process.
In our constitutional philosophy, there is only one ' ism', Indianism.
Intellectuals and thinkers engaged in the debates between socialism and capitalism, democracy and communism, liberalism and conservatism, find little space to engage with spiritualism, Indianism these fuzzy notions of spirituality or the political quagmire of religion are not the tools of those who rely on reason.
The first of these was the publication of Manuel de Jesus Galvan's novel Enriquillo (1882), which made the already evolving neocolonial discourse of Indianism an intrinsic part of Dominican national identity.
Only nationalism explains such disparate phenomena as Indianism and anti-Americanism.
Simply groaning under the banner "parochial" only shows the writer's destructive mind and does not imply true Indianism.