inert gas

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inert gas

n.
A gas that is not chemically reactive, especially a noble gas.

inert gas

n
1. (Elements & Compounds) Also called: noble gas, rare gas or argonon any of the unreactive gaseous elements helium, neon, argon, krypton, xenon, and radon
2. (Chemistry) Also called: noble gas, rare gas or argonon any of the unreactive gaseous elements helium, neon, argon, krypton, xenon, and radon
3. (Chemistry) (loosely) any gas, such as carbon dioxide, that is nonoxidizing

no′ble gas′


n.
any of the chemically inert gaseous elements of group 8A or 0 of the periodic table: helium, neon, argon, krypton, xenon, and radon. Also called inert gas.
[1900–05]

inert gas

ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.inert gas - any of the chemically inert gaseous elements of the helium group in the periodic tableinert gas - any of the chemically inert gaseous elements of the helium group in the periodic table
chemical element, element - any of the more than 100 known substances (of which 92 occur naturally) that cannot be separated into simpler substances and that singly or in combination constitute all matter
Ar, argon, atomic number 18 - a colorless and odorless inert gas; one of the six inert gases; comprises approximately 1% of the earth's atmosphere
atomic number 2, He, helium - a very light colorless element that is one of the six inert gasses; the most difficult gas to liquefy; occurs in economically extractable amounts in certain natural gases (as those found in Texas and Kansas)
atomic number 36, Kr, krypton - a colorless element that is one of the six inert gasses; occurs in trace amounts in air
atomic number 10, Ne, neon - a colorless odorless gaseous element that give a red glow in a vacuum tube; one of the six inert gasses; occurs in the air in small amounts
atomic number 86, radon, Rn - a radioactive gaseous element formed by the disintegration of radium; the heaviest of the inert gasses; occurs naturally (especially in areas over granite) and is considered a hazard to health
atomic number 54, Xe, xenon - a colorless odorless inert gaseous element occurring in the earth's atmosphere in trace amounts
gas - a fluid in the gaseous state having neither independent shape nor volume and being able to expand indefinitely
Translations

inert gas

n (Chem) → Edelgas nt

inert gas

ngas m inerte or nobile
References in periodicals archive ?
Gap closures, 110 wall removal points for inert gases 100 double wall extraction points for acetylene and oxygen 6 relaxation stations 20 solenoid valves dn 50 - dn 10 36 shut - off valves dn 50 - dn 10 20 m underground (4 lines), Hlsrohr kg.
These inert gases provide consistent, eco-conscious foaming while also reducing fire hazards.
These sprinklers use inert gases or liquid chemicals to smother flames.
All the processes currently being used today to produce a plate with a flat top profile are designed to prevent oxygen exchange between ambient air and photopolymerizable layer during the exposure step, either by blocking it at the plate surface with barrier films or by displacing the oxygen with inert gases.
Inert gases are used to supplant air in places where air could come into contact with wine.
Part 1 (January) focused on an alternative-healing modality that builds up regeneration potential by electromagnetically stimulating various inert gases, especially xenon.
DOE and Boeing officials have always said that almost all the radiation was contained inside the reactor and that the only radioactive material to escape was inert gases that posed no threat.
The rock contains buckyballs--soccerball-shaped molecules made of carbon--filled with the inert gases helium and argon.
Inert gases are no longer necessary, reducing the running cost typically associated with firing a dewax oven.
The pumping mechanism buries inert gases in pump surfaces.
The unit offers many different configurations that can be used with water, air, inert gases and some specific explosive gases.
As a result, chemists no longer liked to use the term inert gases, preferring noble gases as less likely to signify absolute inertness.