infallibilism


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infallibilism

(ɪnˈfælɪbəˌlɪzəm)
n
(Roman Catholic Church) RC Church the principle of papal infallibility
inˈfallibilist n

infallibilism

1. the belief in or adherence to the dogma of papal infallibility.
2. the dogma itself.
See also: Catholicism
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References in periodicals archive ?
Intentionally or not, White veers toward a thesis of in-principle infallibilism for human knowers.
Now, this fallibilism is welcome since it isn't clear we could have much knowledge if infallibilism were to be adopted: conclusive grounds, where all possible epistemic challenges top are ruled out, aren't readily available for creatures like us.
troll's chapter 7 (239-75) is a more extensive discussion of Anglican probabilism versus Catholic infallibilism in Biblical exegesis.
Though it is not obvious that infallibilism does lead to skepticism, this paper argues that one should be willing to accept it even if it does.
Cameron, Biblical Higher Criticism and the Defense of Infallibilism in Nineteenth-century Britain (Lewiston, N.
Trojcak agrees with Cornwell that Pope John Paul suffers from "creeping infallibilism," as well as "papal impeccability," both factors which help "mystify the papal office".
We should be careful not to confuse objectivism with infallibilism, and an objectivist is well advised to be a fallibilist, that is, someone who is well aware that he could be wrong and others right, and who thinks long and hard about whether his actions are justified, rather than just assuming that in every case he is the supreme arbiter of morality.
Levi's infallibilism has an at first startling consequence.