morpheme

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Related to Inflectional morpheme: free morpheme, Derivational morpheme

mor·pheme

 (môr′fēm′)
n.
A meaningful linguistic unit that cannot be divided into smaller meaningful parts. The word man and the suffix -ed (as in walked) are morphemes.

[French morphème, blend of Greek morphē, form and French phonème, phoneme; see phoneme.]

mor·phem′ic adj.
mor·phem′i·cal·ly adv.

morpheme

(ˈmɔːfiːm)
n
(Linguistics) linguistics a speech element having a meaning or grammatical function that cannot be subdivided into further such elements
[C20: from French, from Greek morphē form, coined on the model of phoneme; see -eme]
morˈphemic adj
morˈphemically adv

mor•pheme

(ˈmɔr fim)

n.
any of the minimal grammatical units of a language, each constituting a word or meaningful part of a word that cannot be divided into smaller meaningful parts, as the, write, or the -ed of waited. Compare allomorph (def. 2).
[1895–1900; < French morphème; see morph-, -eme]
mor•phe′mic, adj.
mor•phe′mi•cal•ly, adv.

morpheme

A word or part of a word that cannot be further divided into smaller elements.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.morpheme - minimal meaningful language unit; it cannot be divided into smaller meaningful units
language unit, linguistic unit - one of the natural units into which linguistic messages can be analyzed
allomorph - a variant phonological representation of a morpheme; "the final sounds of `bets' and `beds' and `horses' and `oxen' are allomorphs of the English plural morpheme"
free form, free morpheme - a morpheme that can occur alone
bound form, bound morpheme - a morpheme that occurs only as part of a larger construction; eg an -s at the end of plural nouns
classifier - a word or morpheme used in some languages in certain contexts (such as counting) to indicate the semantic class to which the counted item belongs
ending, termination - the end of a word (a suffix or inflectional ending or final morpheme); "I don't like words that have -ism as an ending"
Translations
морфема
morfém
morfeemi
morfem
morféma
morfemaморфема
morfem
морфема

morpheme

[ˈmɔːfiːm] Nmorfema m

morpheme

nMorphem nt

morpheme

[ˈmɔːfiːm] nmorfema m
References in periodicals archive ?
At the same time, zero-derivation constitutes the borderline of derivation with inflection because the zero-morpheme is not incompatible with the presence of an inflectional morpheme.
Specifically, the point of acquisition of a given verbal inflectional morpheme was determined when the same root form appeared correctly in at least two distinct inflected forms and when the same inflection was used with at least two different verbs.
These derivatives are the outcome of a change that occurred to ancient genitives and led an inflectional morpheme marking genitive case to acquire derivational meaning.
These were stimuli containing an existing stem and inflectional morpheme, but which did not generate real words (for example "barleys").
In the article, I claim that the middle marker in Otomi emerged from the reanalysis of an old inflectional morpheme characterizing a subclass of intransitive verbs depicting activities performed by humans.
In both cases an inflectional morpheme for mood, a `to', precedes the infinitive verb.
Matters change, of course, once we are dealing with a more specific inflectional morpheme carrying other information.
For example, using "relevance to syntax" as a criterion for classifying different types of inflectional morpheme, Booij (1996) separates what he calls contextual from inherent inflection.
In other words, partially-naturalised ATTs are not productive for other derivations, "[t]hese accept only the addition of inflectional morphemes, usually the regular plural marker" (Mahadin, 1996, p.
The difference consists in the fact that derivational and inflectional morphemes cannot appear in isolation while the members of compounds can: sky and scraper are autonomous words, whereas -er is not; child is an autonomous word, -hood is not.
First, it is an agglutinative language (such as Finnish or Turkish) so that all inflectional morphemes are morphologically complex, corresponding to phrases or inflected verbs, comprising several morphological constituents (De Rijk, 2007; Hualde & Ortiz de Urbina, 2003; Laka, 1996).