infrared

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in·fra·red

 (ĭn′frə-rĕd′)
adj. Abbr. IR
1. Of or relating to electromagnetic radiation between microwaves and red visible light in the electromagnetic spectrum, having frequencies between 300 gigahertz and 400 terahertz and wavelengths between 1 millimeter and 750 nanometers.
2. Generating, using, or sensitive to infrared radiation.
n.
Infrared light or the infrared part of the spectrum.

infrared

(ˌɪnfrəˈrɛd)
n
(General Physics) the part of the electromagnetic spectrum with a longer wavelength than light but a shorter wavelength than radio waves; radiation with wavelength between 0.8 micrometres and 1 millimetre
adj
(General Physics) of, relating to, using, or consisting of radiation lying within the infrared: infrared radiation.

in`fra•red′

or in`fra-red′,



n.
1. the part of the invisible spectrum that is contiguous to the red end of the visible spectrum and that comprises electromagnetic radiation of wavelengths from 800 nm to 1 mm.
adj.
2. of, pertaining to, or using the infrared or its component rays: infrared radiation. Compare ultraviolet.
[1825–35]

in·fra·red

(ĭn′frə-rĕd′)
Relating to the invisible part of the electromagnetic spectrum with wavelengths longer than those of visible red light but shorter than those of microwaves. See more at electromagnetic spectrum.
Did You Know? In 1800 the astronomer Sir William Herschel discovered infrared light when he was exploring the relationship between heat and light. Herschel used a prism to split a beam of sunlight into a rainbow of colors (red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo, and violet) and measured how hot a thermometer got when it was placed in each of the various bands. Then he tried placing the thermometer just outside the red band, where there was no visible color at all. The thermometer heated up, just as if light were shining on it. Further experiments showed that this invisible form of light behaved just like visible light in many ways; for example, it could be reflected by a mirror. We now call this form of light infrared light. Another kind of invisible light, ultraviolet light, is found just beyond the violet end of the spectrum.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.infrared - the infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum; electromagnetic wave frequencies below the visible range; "they could sense radiation in the infrared"
infrared spectrum - the spectrum of infrared radiation
frequence, frequency, oftenness - the number of occurrences within a given time period; "the frequency of modulation was 40 cycles per second"; "the frequency of his seizures increased as he grew older"
2.infrared - electromagnetic radiation with wavelengths longer than visible light but shorter than radio waves
actinic radiation, actinic ray - electromagnetic radiation that can produce photochemical reactions
Adj.1.infrared - having or employing wavelengths longer than light but shorter than radio waves; lying outside the visible spectrum at its red end; "infrared radiation"; "infrared photography"
invisible, unseeable - impossible or nearly impossible to see; imperceptible by the eye; "the invisible man"; "invisible rays"; "an invisible hinge"; "invisible mending"
Translations
infraroig
infračervený
infrarødinfrarød stråling
infrapuna
적외선
infrarødinfrarød stråling
infravermelho
infrarödinfraröd strålning

infrared

[ˈɪnfrəˈred] ADJ [rays, light] → infrarrojo

infrared

infra-red [ˌɪnfrəˈrɛd] adj
[light, radiation] → infrarouge
[equipment, sensor] → infrarouge; [camera] → infrarouge

infrared

adjinfrarot

infrared

[ˌɪnfrəˈrɛd]
1. adjinfrarosso/a
2. n (raggio) → infrarosso

infrared

adj infrarrojo
References in periodicals archive ?
The body makes infra-red radiation that, with night vision equipment, may be seen from miles away.
This initiates a chemical reaction, which produces carbon dioxide, water vapour and infra-red radiation in the long to low medium wave band of the spectrum.
Infra-red can provide another significant benefit as powder is readily absorbed by short wave, infra-red radiation so that gelling is much faster than in a convection oven.
City buildings in warm climates with "cool coloured" surfaces that reflect infra-red radiation would also be cooler than traditional buildings and so would conserve energy - and carbon - that would otherwise be used on air conditioning.
Known risk factors for development of true exfoliation include infra-red radiation and trauma.
Astronomers used infra-red radiation instead of visible light to enable them to see through much of the dust in the Milky Way and record details of the centre of the galaxy.
Carbon infra-red (CIR) is ideal for applications in the food industry, such as surface browning, as it delivers medium wave, infra-red radiation, which is perfectly suited to evaporating water from products at a very high power density.