in-joke

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in-joke

(ĭn′jōk′)
n. Informal
A joke originated or appreciated by the members of a particular group.

in′-jok′ey adj.

in-joke

n
a joke which is understood only by a particular group of people

in′-joke`



n.
a joke that can be understood or appreciated only by a limited group of people.
[1960–65]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.in-joke - a joke that is appreciated only by members of some particular group of people
gag, jape, jest, joke, laugh - a humorous anecdote or remark intended to provoke laughter; "he told a very funny joke"; "he knows a million gags"; "thanks for the laugh"; "he laughed unpleasantly at his own jest"; "even a schoolboy's jape is supposed to have some ascertainable point"
References in periodicals archive ?
It has been a little injoke for a while that the site of the Unicorn Inn - where they had strong ale and a substantial supper - is now a health food store.
Fans will also appreciate the injoke of the names in Mulder's mobile phone address book, visible as he foolishly tries to call Scully while driving one-handed along an icy road.
The whole gig is like an injoke the audience and band share.
As compensation for being refused her injoke bit part, she did get a rare chance to do some stunt work, action adventure having been, up until now, a genre she seemed to have overlooked in her otherwise impressive career in film, television and theatre.
But then since the band in question happens to made up of clones of themselves I suppose that's meant to be deliberate injoke irony.
A true treat for art house devotees (who will love the injoke reference to Laconte/Rochefort classic The Hairdresser's Husband) and the thinking mainstream audience alike.
Linklater aficionados will enjoy the injoke references to his previous films and philosophy students can use it as a springboard for debate in the pub afterwards, but almost everyone else may well find themselves being put to sleep by the arch pretentiousness of it all.
But amid the cameos, wink-wink movie references and injokes, everything else is a touch dull, with the kidnap plot being not just humdrum, but exposing (yet again) Clooney's mistaken belief he can do comedy.
Many of the injokes and cultural references in the show will only fully resonate with Indigenous viewers, the most notable of which being the ghost of Eden Freeburn (Ursula Yovich), the mother of lead character Odin (Kelton Pell).
The film is rife with injokes, including Matt Damon''s false nose (a reference to The Brothers Grimm, in which the studio barred his character from wearing one), and the jibes traded by Clooney and Brad Pitt, above, which seem to refer to their real lives.